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    #1

    Question what the differences between "intend to do" and "intend doing something"

    Dear Mr Answer:
    Is there any differences between "intend to do" and "intend doing something"
    How do you use them in different ways?(if there is)


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    #2

    Talking Re: what the differences between "intend to do" and "intend doing something"

    Quote Originally Posted by shinji002 View Post
    Dear Mr Answer:
    Is there any differences between "intend to do" and "intend doing something"
    How do you use them in different ways?(if there is)
    I think it is just a little bit difference between "intend to do" and "intend doing something" because " intend + V_ing" is derived from British English. You can use both of them without changing the meaning in your sentence(s).

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    #3

    Question Re: what the differences between "intend to do" and "intend doing something"

    Quote Originally Posted by blue_wind View Post
    I think it is just a little bit difference between "intend to do" and "intend doing something" because " intend + V_ing" is derived from British English. You can use both of them without changing the meaning in your sentence(s).

    Really???? Is there any Native English speaker confirms that is ture?

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    #4

    Re: what the differences between "intend to do" and "intend doing something"

    I expect to find an infinitive after the verb "intend."

    How do you intend to spend your inheritance?
    What do you intend to do while in Paris?
    I intend to contact your teacher as soon as possible.

    As an American English speaker, I find the -ing form awkward and unnatural.

    [not a teacher]

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    #5

    Re: what the differences between "intend to do" and "intend doing something"

    Quote Originally Posted by shinji002 View Post
    Dear Mr Answer:
    Is there any differences between "intend to do" and "intend doing something"
    How do you use them in different ways?(if there is)
    Intend is one of the many verbs that can be followed by an infinitive and not by a gerund : intend to do

    verbs followed by gerunds and infinitives

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    #6

    Question Re: what the differences between "intend to do" and "intend doing something"

    in‧tend S3 W1 /Żn"tend/ [transitive]
    1 to have something in your mind as a plan or purpose [↪ intention]
    Part1:
    intend to do something
    I intend to spend the night there.
    intend somebody/something to do something
    I didn't intend her to see the painting until it was finished.
    I never intended things to turn out the way they did.
    intend that
    It is intended that these meetings will become a regular event.

    Part2:
    intend doing something
    We intend looking at the situation again.
    I fully intend (=definitely intend) to return home next year.

    As you can see, Longman Dic indicates that you can use intend doing something......

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    #7

    Re: what the differences between "intend to do" and "intend doing something"

    Pop UP! Is there any one can solve it??

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    #8

    Re: what the differences between "intend to do" and "intend doing something"

    Quote Originally Posted by shinji002 View Post
    in‧tend S3 W1 /Żn"tend/ [transitive]
    1 to have something in your mind as a plan or purpose [↪ intention]
    Part1:
    intend to do something
    I intend to spend the night there.
    intend somebody/something to do something
    I didn't intend her to see the painting until it was finished.
    I never intended things to turn out the way they did.
    intend that
    It is intended that these meetings will become a regular event.

    Part2:
    intend doing something
    We intend looking at the situation again.
    I fully intend (=definitely intend) to return home next year.

    As you can see, Longman Dic indicates that you can use intend doing something......
    I am sure you are right when you quote Longman dictionary, but I wouldn`t use intend going if I took part in an FCE examination, because the verb intend is on the list of the verbs followed by long infinitive verbs:

    Cambridge Dictionaries Online - Cambridge University Press

    Definition
    intend Show phonetics
    verb [T]
    to have as a plan or purpose:
    [+ to infinitive] We intend to go to Australia next year.
    Somehow I offended him, which wasn't what I'd intended.
    [+ object + to infinitive] I don't think she intended me to hear the remark.

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    #9

    Thumbs up Re: what the differences between "intend to do" and "intend doing something"

    Quote Originally Posted by Teia View Post
    I am sure you are right when you quote Longman dictionary, but I wouldn`t use intend going if I took part in an FCE examination, because the verb intend is on the list of the verbs followed by long infinitive verbs:

    Cambridge Dictionaries Online - Cambridge University Press

    Definition
    intend Show phonetics
    verb [T]
    to have as a plan or purpose:
    [+ to infinitive] We intend to go to Australia next year.
    Somehow I offended him, which wasn't what I'd intended.
    [+ object + to infinitive] I don't think she intended me to hear the remark.
    oh,thank you. maybe all of them are right,just different regions have different ways to express things.....thank you

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