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  1. J. Krov
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    #1

    Smile teacher

    How can one tell the difference between an idiom and hyperbole? For instance, a statement was made in a novel to the effect, "...the boy was going to do something to crank up his mother." The meaning was that he was going to make his mother very excited, even angry. Would that be an idiom or hyperbole?


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    #2

    Re: teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by J. Krov View Post
    How can one tell the difference between an idiom and hyperbole? For instance, a statement was made in a novel to the effect, "...the boy was going to do something to crank up his mother." The meaning was that he was going to make his mother very excited, even angry. Would that be an idiom or hyperbole?
    Hyperbole is a phrase that is an exaggeration

    The car was flying down the highway.

    Obviously a car cannot fly but it was going so fast it seemed like it.

    An idiom is a phrase that is nonsensical as it is written, but has a meaning of its own. In your example, "to crank up" is an idiom similar to "to wind up" which means to make someone excited or angry as you point out. This is not an exaggeration.

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    #3

    Re: teacher

    From a reliable source I know that the expression "crank up" is an idiom which have two meanings

    1) get started
    as in
    "The theater season is cranking up with four benefit performances."

    This expression transforms the literal sense of crank "operate a motor by turning a crank; to starting any activity".

    2)stimulate or intensify one,s efforts
    as in
    "We've got to crank up enthusiasm for this new product.

    In my native language the meaning of this idiom is the same.

    V.


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    #4

    Re: teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    From a reliable source I know that the expression "crank up" is an idiom which have two meanings

    1) get started
    as in
    "The theater season is cranking up with four benefit performances."

    This expression transforms the literal sense of crank "operate a motor by turning a crank; to starting any activity".

    2)stimulate or intensify one,s efforts
    as in
    "We've got to crank up enthusiasm for this new product.

    In my native language the meaning of this idiom is the same.

    V.
    Only the second meaning applies in this context. They are not the same in English

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    #5

    Re: teacher

    No objections.

    I hinted just the second meaning about this case. The first meaning was for your information only.

    V.

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    #6

    Re: teacher

    No objections.

    I hinted just the second meaning about this case. The first meaning was for your information only.

    Referring to the word "same" my idea was like this.

    We (the people in my country) treated this idiom in the "same" manner".

    V.

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