Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #1

    lent,lease,rent

    Dear teachers,
    In the sentence "have you heard that Netherfield Park is let at last." I found the word "let" with a new for me meaning (let = rent, lease).
    I wonder if you could tell me whether this word in this meaning is in a widespread use nowadays or it is discard.

  1. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #2

    Re: lent,lease,rent

    It is current. One very common example is the estate agent's sign 'To let' - which advertises a property as available for rent, but not for sale.

    Incidentally, I don't know whether there's a typo in your thread title, but "let" does not equal "lent".

    b

  2. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #3

    Re: lent,lease,rent

    PS

    There's another totally different use of "let" (which used* to have a distinct vowel sound) - meaning "obstacle". This persists only in a few fossils, such as the phrase 'without let or hindrance' (you can see this on UK passports), or in tennis (when the net is an obstacle to the progress of a service - let).

    Read more here: Online Etymology Dictionary

    b
    PPS *Several hundred years ago

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #4

    Re: lent,lease,rent

    Hi BobK,
    Thank you for your comprehensive explanation. I liked your additions especially those one referring fossils and tennis. Thank you also for the new link which is new for me (Online Etymology Dictionary).
    To my great regret I have made a typo in the title (instead "lent" you have to read "let". Really you have a penetrating look.

    Thank you again.

    V
    Last edited by vil; 07-Oct-2007 at 13:23.

  3. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #5

    Re: lent,lease,rent

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Hi BobK,
    Thank you for your comprehensive explanation. I liked your additions especially those one referring fossils and tennis. Thank you also for the new link which is new for me (Online Etymology Dictionary).
    To my great regret I have made a typo in the title (instead "lent" you have to read "let". Really you have a penetrating look.

    Thank you again.

    V
    Thank you - I'm glad it helped.

    b


    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 1,153
    #6

    Re: lent,lease,rent

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    It is current. One very common example is the estate agent's sign 'To let' - which advertises a property as available for rent, but not for sale.

    Incidentally, I don't know whether there's a typo in your thread title, but "let" does not equal "lent".

    b
    "let" used in this fashion is British English. It is rarely used if at all in Canadian or American real estate signs or advertising. I am not sure of other English types.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #7

    Re: lent,lease,rent

    Hi Naamplao,

    Thank you very much for your addition. This was my vague conjecture.

    V.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •