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    #1

    set aside a sale

    Could anyone please explain what the following expressions in bold mean in easy English?

    1. In commercial law, there are several reasons for setting aside a sale.

    Does this mean "annul the sale?"

    2. Like the slogan that Timex Watches used for a half century, "It takes a licking and keeps on ticking."

    3. The dissatisfied customers did not want to sue. All they wanted was for the product you sold them to perform as you had told them it would. They just wanted to be "made whole."

    Thank you.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #2

    Re: set aside a sale

    Quote Originally Posted by unpakwon View Post
    Could anyone please explain what the following expressions in bold mean in easy English?

    1. In commercial law, there are several reasons for setting aside a sale.

    Does this mean "annul the sale?" That is about right.

    2. Like the slogan that Timex Watches used for a half century, "It takes a licking and keeps on ticking." "Takes a licking" >> "Takes a beating" [a licking is a slang term for a beating] - it means that Timex watches are tough.

    3. The dissatisfied customers did not want to sue. All they wanted was for the product you sold them to perform as you had told them it would. They just wanted to be "made whole." I have not met this usage. It seems to mean that they wanted a replacement for the faulty goods.

    Thank you.
    .

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    #3

    Re: set aside a sale

    OK. Thank you for the help.


    • Join Date: Sep 2007
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    #4

    Re: set aside a sale

    Quote Originally Posted by unpakwon View Post
    Could anyone please explain what the following expressions in bold mean in easy English?

    1. In commercial law, there are several reasons for setting aside a sale.

    Does this mean "annul the sale?"

    2. Like the slogan that Timex Watches used for a half century, "It takes a licking and keeps on ticking."

    3. The dissatisfied customers did not want to sue. All they wanted was for the product you sold them to perform as you had told them it would. They just wanted to be "made whole."

    Thank you.
    Anglika answered the first 2 questions as I would.

    I also haven't heard of "made whole" used in this fashion.

    I have heard this expression used with respect to spiritual healing.

    "Turning away from drugs and alcohol and believing in Jesus has made me whole."

    I don't believe this applies in your example though.

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