Results 1 to 6 of 6
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Jan 2006
    • Posts: 2,081
    #1

    Question But for that viewshaft

    "But for that viewshaft our flat would be much cheaper."

    How should this sentence be understood?

    Nyggus


    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 1,153
    #2

    Re: But for that viewshaft

    Quote Originally Posted by nyggus View Post
    "But for that viewshaft our flat would be much cheaper."

    How should this sentence be understood?

    Nyggus
    "viewshaft" if it is a word must be British English (the use of the word "flat" gives me this clue"

    If I had to guess at what it meant I would say that "viewshaft" is a narrow view seen through the window of the apartment(flat). So in this sentence the person is saying that the "viewshaft" is so good that the landlord charges extra rent for this flat.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Jan 2006
    • Posts: 2,081
    #3

    Re: But for that viewshaft

    Quote Originally Posted by Naamplao View Post
    "viewshaft" if it is a word must be British English (the use of the word "flat" gives me this clue"

    If I had to guess at what it meant I would say that "viewshaft" is a narrow view seen through the window of the apartment(flat). So in this sentence the person is saying that the "viewshaft" is so good that the landlord charges extra rent for this flat.
    Yes, you guessed the meaning of "viewshaft" very well. What troubles me is that "but for that viewshaft"; the same meaning would be obtained with the following sentence:
    "Without that viewshaft our flat would be much cheaper,"
    wouldn't it? In such case, then, this "but for" should stand for "without", of course roughly put. Does it?

    Many thanks,
    Nyggus


    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 1,153
    #4

    Re: But for that viewshaft

    Quote Originally Posted by nyggus View Post
    Yes, you guessed the meaning of "viewshaft" very well. What troubles me is that "but for that viewshaft"; the same meaning would be obtained with the following sentence:
    "Without that viewshaft our flat would be much cheaper,"
    wouldn't it? In such case, then, this "but for" should stand for "without", of course roughly put. Does it?

    Many thanks,
    Nyggus
    Your way of rephrasing the sentence is better and more commonly said. However, the way it is originally written is correct and sometimes used.

    "but for" does not mean "without" exactly though it is close to the meaning. It is hard to say what it means in a few words. It is used mainly in reading/writing English if at all. You would never say this and if you heard it you would think the person is very arty or snobbish.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #5

    Re: But for that viewshaft

    "Viewshaft" according to Wordspy is the view between buildings and other objects that one has of a lake, mountain or other natural feature.

  1. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #6

    Re: But for that viewshaft

    Quote Originally Posted by Naamplao View Post
    ... You would never say this and if you heard it you would think the person is very arty or snobbish.
    Or, of course, British.

    b

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •