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  1. angliholic's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile it will have been raining

    If it rains tomorrow, it will have been raining for a week.
    If it rains tomorrow, it will have rained for a week.


    Do the above two samples mean the same to you? Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: it will have been raining

    Yes.

  2. angliholic's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: it will have been raining

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    Yes.
    Thanks, 2006.
    But my grammar book states that the first one impies that it's still raining now while the second doesn't. Do you agree with this?
    Last edited by angliholic; 09-Oct-2007 at 17:28.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: it will have been raining

    That doesn't make logical sense to say it's not raining now, regardless of which way your phrase the comment about tomorrow.

    If tomorrow will make 7 straight days of rain, then logic tells you it's raining today. Otherwise, tomorrow would be "one day in a row" and not "seven days in a row."

  4. angliholic's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: it will have been raining

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    That doesn't make logical sense to say it's not raining now, regardless of which way your phrase the comment about tomorrow.

    If tomorrow will make 7 straight days of rain, then logic tells you it's raining today. Otherwise, tomorrow would be "one day in a row" and not "seven days in a row."
    Sorry! Barb.
    I think i was sleepy. I mean my grammar book states that the first sentence implies that it'll be still raining tomorrow while the second doesn't.

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