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  1. blouen's Avatar
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    #1

    Beat it!

    What does it mean?

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    #2

    Re: Beat it!

    Hello Blouen,

    It means "Leave this place immediately and at great speed!".

    The implication is usually that physical violence of some kind will ensue, if you don't obey. Usually, it is only said by a speaker who has some reasonable chance of carrying out the unspoken threat (e.g. an adult to children).

    All the best,

    MrP
    ·
    Not a professional ESL teacher.
    ·

  2. blouen's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Beat it!

    Quote Originally Posted by MrPedantic View Post
    Hello Blouen,

    It means "Leave this place immediately and at great speed!".

    The implication is usually that physical violence of some kind will ensue, if you don't obey. Usually, it is only said by a speaker who has some reasonable chance of carrying out the unspoken threat (e.g. an adult to children).

    All the best,

    MrP
    Thanks,

    That´s exactly what I wanted.

    I heard this expression in the movie ¨Irobot¨.
    Spooner, Will Smith, told the cat that has been following him all around the house of a late doctor to ¨beat it¨.

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    #4

    Re: Beat it!

    Ah! I hope the cat understood English.

    I'm not sure what the origin of the phrase is. "To beat the streets" (cf. "to pound the streets") means "to walk the streets persistently". (Thus the area a policeman patrols is his "beat".) There may be a connection.

    All the best,

    MrP
    ·
    Not a professional ESL teacher.
    ·

  3. blouen's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Beat it!

    Quote Originally Posted by MrPedantic View Post
    Ah! I hope the cat understood English.

    I'm not sure what the origin of the phrase is. "To beat the streets" (cf. "to pound the streets") means "to walk the streets persistently". (Thus the area a policeman patrols is his "beat".) There may be a connection.

    All the best,

    MrP
    hehe, you hoped wrong.
    The cat didn´t move a bit, but followed him and he later on took it home to her grandma.

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