Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. Nefertiti's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 383
    #1

    by now

    Hi there.

    "Dave doesn't believe in aliens. He says that if life existed on other planets, we would know by now."

    What does 'by now' mean? Does it have the same meaning as 'now'?

    Thanks in advance.


    • Join Date: Jun 2006
    • Posts: 78
    #2

    Re: by now

    Yep more or less...


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #3

    Re: by now

    Quote Originally Posted by Nefertiti View Post
    Hi there.

    "Dave doesn't believe in aliens. He says that if life existed on other planets, we would know by now."

    What does 'by now' mean? Does it have the same meaning as 'now'?

    Thanks in advance.
    by now> by this time

  2. Nefertiti's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 383
    #4

    Re: by now

    Hi, Anglika.

    "By this time he was thirty."
    Is it OK to say, "by now he was thirty"?



    Per Anglika, by now> by this time, does '>' mean equivalent?

    Thanks for your reply.

    _________________
    a previous discussion titled 'by this time'


    "By this time he was thirty."

    1. What does 'by this time' mean?

    2. I assume 'he was thirty' means 'he was thirty years old.' Why 'was'? Why not 'is'? In short, why past tense?

    3. Is 'time' countable here?

    Answers to the questions:

    1 At the point of time in the narrative. Presumably it covers the time before and after this.
    2 He must be older than that or dead now.
    3 No


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #5

    Re: by now

    [ > shorthand for an arrow Yes, take it as meaning "equivalent]

    "By now he was thirty" is fine - in the right context.

    Joey was a fine boy. He always did what was expected of him. His behaviour was exemplary. His parents had no problems with him except one. By now he was thirty and there was still no sign of a girl-friend.

  3. Nefertiti's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 383
    #6

    Re: by now

    Hi, Anglika.

    So, is the usage of 'by now' and 'by this time' the same?
    You wrote, "Joey was a fine boy. He always did what was expected of him. His behaviour was exemplary. His parents had no problems with him except one. By now he was thirty and there was still no sign of a girl-friend."

    What if I change it to 'By this time he was 30 and there was still no sign of a girl-friend'. Would it changes the meaning?

    Thanks for your example, very interesting!


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #7

    Re: by now

    It is very very subtle. They are so close in meaning that yes, you can use either. I feel that there is a slight feeling that things are not quite satisfactory in the situation if "by now" is used in this context rather than "by this time" - but this may be entirely my subjective judgement.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •