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    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 722
    #1

    IN or On?

    In the morning/ In the afternoon/ evening
    but why:
    On Saturday nights
    On a winter morning?


    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 78
    #2

    Talking Re: IN or On?

    i think in is 4 a place like "in my bed". . .
    and on is 4 a date like "on september". . .



    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 9
    #3

    Exclamation Re: IN or On?

    We use ON when mentioning a day:

    ON MONDAY, ON SATURDAY MORNING, ON A WINTER'S DAY, ON CHRISTMAS DAY, ON EASTER DAY, ON SEPTEMBER 2 (but we say IN SEPTEMBER), ON THE FOURTH OF JULY.

    Also, ON is used when it is implied that something is in direct contact with a surface, especially if it is a flat surface (physically speaking):

    There is lots of food on my plate.
    Don't leave your socks on your bed. (But we say "she is not going to work today because she is in bed"; in the sense of being lying on the bed due to health problems).
    Your picture has been on my wall for ages.

    In addition, we use "ON" when referring to different media or means of communication:

    Ruth loves talking on the phone.
    I saw it on TV.
    Uncle John gave such an amazing interview on the radio yesterday.

    Moreover, we use "ON" when talking about means of transportation inside which there are aisles or proper places to walk around:

    ON THE SHIP, PLANE, TRAIN, METRO, BUS. (But we say "in the helicopter, car, balloon").

    What one should bear in mind is that prepositions are learned through constant practice.

    NOTE: These are some observations I made myself throughout all these years I have been teaching. I am certain there are many more occasions on which ON is used (by the way, we use "on" with the word "occasion"). ;-D

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Romanian
      • Home Country:
      • Romania
      • Current Location:
      • Romania

    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 1,948
    #4

    Re: IN or On?

    Quote Originally Posted by williambosich View Post
    We use ON when mentioning a day:

    ON MONDAY, ON SATURDAY MORNING, ON A WINTER'S DAY, ON CHRISTMAS DAY, ON EASTER DAY, ON SEPTEMBER 2 (but we say IN SEPTEMBER), ON THE FOURTH OF JULY.

    Also, ON is used when it is implied that something is in direct contact with a surface, especially if it is a flat surface (physically speaking):

    There is lots of food on my plate.
    Don't leave your socks on your bed. (But we say "she is not going to work today because she is in bed"; in the sense of being lying on the bed due to health problems).
    Your picture has been on my wall for ages.

    In addition, we use "ON" when referring to different media or means of communication:

    Ruth loves talking on the phone.
    I saw it on TV.
    Uncle John gave such an amazing interview on the radio yesterday.

    Moreover, we use "ON" when talking about means of transportation inside which there are aisles or proper places to walk around:

    ON THE SHIP, PLANE, TRAIN, METRO, BUS. (But we say "in the helicopter, car, balloon").

    What one should bear in mind is that prepositions are learned through constant practice.

    NOTE: These are some observations I made myself throughout all these years I have been teaching. I am certain there are many more occasions on which ON is used (by the way, we use "on" with the word "occasion"). ;-D
    Additionally, metro is the name for the underground electric railway of Paris, France, Montreal, Canada, Washington, D.C., Bucharest and other cities.
    The equivalent for metro is underground in B.E and subway in A.E.

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