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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    sleep, nap, drowse, slumber, snooze

    Hi,

    Can someone clarify the differences between these words ?
    As far as I see all except 'sleep' describes short or light sleep. But what are the differences between them ? Which one is used in which situation ?

    Another thing is;
    When should I use sleepy and when should I use drowsy ? I'd appreciate if you give examples.

    Regards,

    Sammy


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: sleep, nap, drowse, slumber, snooze

    Have you checked them in a dictionary?

  2. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 2
    #3

    Re: sleep, nap, drowse, slumber, snooze

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Have you checked them in a dictionary?
    Yes. dictionary.com says:

    nap: to sleep for a short time; doze.
    drowse: to be sleepy or half-asleep.
    slumber: to sleep, esp. lightly; doze; drowse.
    snooze: to sleep; slumber; doze; nap.

    I was actually just using nap and sleep in my daily speaking. But then I saw 'drowsy driving' somewhere and I wondered why this wasn't 'sleepy driving'. After a few dictionary lookups I came up with all these words.

    I think nap and sleep are definitely different from the others. But drowse, slumber and snooze are so close and I think I need some extra help in understanding the difference.

    Regards,

    Sammy

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Jul 2006
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    #4

    Re: sleep, nap, drowse, slumber, snooze

    Quote Originally Posted by samzzar View Post
    ...
    I was actually just using nap and sleep in my daily speaking. But then I saw 'drowsy driving' somewhere and I wondered why this wasn't 'sleepy driving'. After a few dictionary lookups I came up with all these words.

    I think nap and sleep are definitely different from the others. But drowse, slumber and snooze are so close and I think I need some extra help in understanding the difference.

    Regards,

    Sammy
    The context could help with 'drowsy driving' - or it might just be the attraction of the alliteration [repetition of /dr/, in this case]. There are lots of overlaps between the meanings of these words, but that doesn't make them interchangeable. Collocation is the thing; for example Take a nap but not Take a sleep [but Have a nap/sleep].

    b

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    • Join Date: Oct 2007
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    #5

    Re: sleep, nap, drowse, slumber, snooze

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    There are lots of overlaps between the meanings of these words, but that doesn't make them interchangeable. Collocation is the thing; for example Take a nap but not Take a sleep [but Have a nap/sleep].
    Yeah for sleep and nap, I can see the clear difference.
    Actually my first question was wrong, I shouldn't have included sleep and nap at the first place.

    When it comes to drowse, slumber and snooze ? Can someone give examples for the usage ?


    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 1,153
    #6

    Re: sleep, nap, drowse, slumber, snooze

    Quote Originally Posted by samzzar View Post
    Yeah for sleep and nap, I can see the clear difference.
    Actually my first question was wrong, I shouldn't have included sleep and nap at the first place.

    When it comes to drowse, slumber and snooze ? Can someone give examples for the usage ?
    When you are drowsy you are in that state of being half asleep and half awake. Your eyelids are heavy and your head nods forward but you suddenly realize you are falling asleep and jerk it back. It happens a lot with long distance drivers and is a cause of many traffic accidents.

    John felt drowsy as he drove on the highway so he wisely decided to pull over and have a rest.

    A slumber is a deep sleep usually dreamless.

    The bed was so comfortable he was in a deep slumber for hours.

    A snooze is a short nap

    I feel a bit tired I think I'll have a snooze before dinner.

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