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    #1

    I need your help

    Hi


    I know that ought to is used to advise and make recommendations. I`ve read that ought not -without to - is used to advise against doing something.

    source:ENGLISH PAGE - Ought to

    e.g. Mark ought not drink so much.
    My question is : shall I always use this modal verb without the preposition to when I put ought to in the negative or are there any other situations in which I have to use it?


    Thank you very much.


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    #2

    Re: I need your help

    Hi Teia...there are no instances that I can think of in British English where you would use the "to" in the negative form.

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    #3

    Re: I need your help

    I am afraid that I can't agree with Moggy on this issue as I would always say 'not to'. The British National Corpus has examples of 'ought not to'. It has 255 examples of this structure, against 6 without 'to'. You don't hear it used much in speech because 'shouldn't + verb' is easier to say.

    Here are the first ten examples:

    influence can be most effectively attacked by pointing out those faults which ought not to be copied, and those virtues any emulation of which
    such notions did not worry Hong Kong before Tiananmen, they ought not to worry it now. China maintains the same professed intentions
    the same subject matter as the claim, the counterclaiming defendant ought not to be required to give security for costs of that counterclaim
    in a crucial World Cup qualifying tie in Chorzow, England ought not to embark for Italy next summer without first packing trench tools
    care about trivialities. Fisher objected that an Archbishop of York ought not to encourage illegality by being present at the requiem; and
    unusual. It is orthodox doctrine that the Archbishop of York ought not to hold exactly the same opinions as the Archbishop of Canterbury
    deliberately; for the alternative is so grave that the choice ought not to be made on only a narrow margin of evidence or
    entrepreneurial people out there to think there's an opportunity they ought not to miss. The City is going through a very muddled
    ribbon-cutting and into politically dangerous areas, where constitutionally, he ought not to be. Adeane was also unhappy about his association with
    growth and low inflation matches an appetite for change that ought not to be surprising in a society where half the population is
    Last edited by Tdol; 24-Oct-2007 at 09:20.

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    #4

    Re: I need your help

    Quote Originally Posted by Teia View Post
    Hi


    I`ve read that ought not -without to - is used to advise against doing something.

    source:ENGLISH PAGE - Ought to

    e.g. Mark ought not drink so much.

    Thank you very much.
    I agree with Tdol. Personally, I would never say or write this construction. It seems very odd to me as British English speaker, and I would always include 'to'.

    finta

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