Results 1 to 4 of 4

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 28
    #1

    Homefront, take to streets

    I was looking up the horoscope, and i didn't really understand what "home front" exactly meant.
    This is the original text : You may be resisting obligations on the home front. No matter how much you struggle, you won't be able to escape from doing your part. You might not be happy with someone who is making demands on you. Whatever alienation you are feeling is part of your way to build walls around your emotional castle.


    When i looked up the dictionary it only said
    "the civilian sector of a nation at war when its armed forces are in combat abroad "

    This definition certainly wouldn't make any sense in the above paragraph.
    Is "resist on the homefront" an idiom? if it is, then what does it mean?

    also, i wanted to ask you about "take to the streets."
    the original text was : Thousands of people have taken to the streets in defiance of the curfew.
    I was looking up to see the meaning of the word "defiance" when i came across this example sentence.
    Though i was able to catch the glimpse of the meaning, I wasn't sure of the exact meaning of "take to the streets" and how it could be used, whether it's formal or not and so on.

    oh, and lastly,
    i also have a question on "quote."

    My friends and I are practicsing translating Korean to English and vice versa, and when i wrote

    - The Reuters have quoted a government official that "blah blah blah"

    my friends pointed out that i need "as saying" if i wanted to use "quote" word. that is, they think the sentence should be

    the reuters have quoted a government offical as saying that "blah blah"



    I disagreed but I was overruled. It still does not make any sense to me.
    do i really need phrases such as "as saying" ?



    thanks :)


    • Join Date: Feb 2007
    • Posts: 175
    #2

    Re: Homefront, take to streets

    Home front as used in your horoscope means "domestic situation" or "at home". It is borrowed I think from the war years in Europe.

    "Take to the streets" This usually indicates civil disobedience...a protest against the authorities as a way of making a government for example, aware of public feelings.

    "Reuters have quoted a government offical as saying that "blah blah" is the correct way of saying this.


    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 1,153
    #3

    Re: Homefront, take to streets

    Quote Originally Posted by kpkroy View Post
    I was looking up the horoscope, and i didn't really understand what "home front" exactly meant.
    This is the original text : You may be resisting obligations on the home front. No matter how much you struggle, you won't be able to escape from doing your part. You might not be happy with someone who is making demands on you. Whatever alienation you are feeling is part of your way to build walls around your emotional castle.


    When i looked up the dictionary it only said
    "the civilian sector of a nation at war when its armed forces are in combat abroad "

    This definition certainly wouldn't make any sense in the above paragraph.
    Is "resist on the homefront" an idiom? if it is, then what does it mean?
    You don't have to be in a physical war. It can just be the daily struggle in life. In this case, the horoscope is saying that you should pay attention to what is happening at home (the homefront). It claims the person is ignoring his obligations to his family and he is building walls around himself (meaning he is ignoring them).

    Yes life is a battle sometimes.

    Quote Originally Posted by kpkroy View Post
    also, i wanted to ask you about "take to the streets."
    the original text was : Thousands of people have taken to the streets in defiance of the curfew.
    I was looking up to see the meaning of the word "defiance" when i came across this example sentence.
    Though i was able to catch the glimpse of the meaning, I wasn't sure of the exact meaning of "take to the streets" and how it could be used, whether it's formal or not and so on.
    Take to the streets means to come out of houses and form into a riot. It is a commonly used idiom...not formal language as such.

    Quote Originally Posted by kpkroy View Post
    oh, and lastly,
    i also have a question on "quote."

    My friends and I are practicing translating Korean to English and vice versa, and when i wrote

    - The Reuters have quoted a government official that "blah blah blah"

    my friends pointed out that i need "as saying" if i wanted to use "quote" word. that is, they think the sentence should be

    the reuters have quoted a government offical as saying that "blah blah"

    I disagreed but I was overruled. It still does not make any sense to me.
    do i really need phrases such as "as saying" ?

    thanks :)
    Your friends are correct the only difference I would make is drop the "the" before "Reuters" unless you say "The Reuters agency..." Also I would change "have" to "has". Reuters is not a plural noun.

    Reuters has quoted a government official as saying that "blah blah"


    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 28
    #4

    Re: Homefront, take to streets

    OH this is so nice!

    thank you all for the explanation ^_^) !!

Similar Threads

  1. On the streets
    By ian2 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 29-Sep-2007, 16:07
  2. through/around the streets
    By user_gary in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 17-Aug-2007, 00:20
  3. People in the streets
    By Progress in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 28-Apr-2007, 15:48
  4. Street / Streets
    By jack in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 17-Jan-2005, 09:37

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •