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  1. angliholic's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile he had to work holidays

    Max was the newest policeman in town so he usually had to work holidays. On Halloween, while other policemen were dressing their childrenin costumes for trick-or-treating. Max had to stick around the police station and answer the phone. He got a call at 8:30 by a man who complained that his neighbors' music was loud. Max told him he'd be over right away. Finally, he reached the house and rang the doorbell several times. A woman opened the door and looked at Max. She said she has run out of candy. She also said it serves him right since he's too old for trick-or-treating. With that, she closed the door on Max's face.


    I presume there are something wrong with all of the underlined parts. The following is my version. Correct me if I am wrong. Thanks.

    Max ...work on holidays ...trick-or-treat ...stick around at the police station ... had run out of candy ... trick-or-treat ... served ... he was ... trick-or-treat ... After putting that, she closed the door to shut him out.

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    #2

    Re: he had to work holidays

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Max was the newest policeman in town so he usually had to work holidays. On Halloween, while other policemen were dressing their childrenin costumes for trick-or-treating, Max had to stick around the police station and answer the phone. He got a call at 8:30 by a man who complained that his neighbors' music was loud. Max told him he'd be over right away. Finally, he reached the house and rang the doorbell several times. A woman opened the door and looked at Max. She said she has run out of candy. She also said it serves him right since he's too old for trick-or-treating. With that, she closed the door on Max's face.


    I presume there are something wrong with all of the underlined parts. The following is my version. Correct me if I am wrong. Thanks.

    Max ...work on holidays ...trick-or-treat ...stick around at the police station ... had run out of candy ... trick-or-treat ... served ... he was ... trick-or-treat ... After putting that, she closed the door to shut him out.

    Hi Angliholic!

    This is very informal, conversational North American English.

    As far as I can see, it is fine as it stands, but wouldn't pass for the Queen's English!

    finta


    • Join Date: Sep 2007
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    #3

    Re: he had to work holidays

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Max was the newest policeman in town so he usually had to work holidays. On Halloween, while other policemen were dressing their childrenin costumes for trick-or-treating. Max had to stick around the police station and answer the phone. He got a call at 8:30 by a man who complained that his neighbors' music was loud. Max told him he'd be over right away. Finally, he reached the house and rang the doorbell several times. A woman opened the door and looked at Max. She said she has run out of candy. She also said it serves him right since he's too old for trick-or-treating. With that, she closed the door on Max's face.


    I presume there are something wrong with all of the underlined parts. The following is my version. Correct me if I am wrong. Thanks.

    Max ...work on holidays ...trick-or-treat ...stick around at the police station ... had run out of candy ... trick-or-treat ... served ... he was ... trick-or-treat ... After putting that, she closed the door to shut him out.
    Most if not all of your corrections are not correct. The passage is fine as written in informal American English.

  2. angliholic's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: he had to work holidays

    Quote Originally Posted by finta View Post
    Hi Angliholic!

    This is very informal, conversational North American English.

    As far as I can see, it is fine as it stands, but wouldn't pass for the Queen's English!

    finta
    Thanks, finta, for your helpful reply.

    For the sake of curiosity, I find your expression I bolded very interesting.
    I presume it means it wouldn't be regarded as the noble/refined/standard English, right?

    Furthermore, what is the difference between treat-or-trick and treat-or-tricking?

    Last, what idea does with that try to convey?


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    #5

    Re: he had to work holidays

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Thanks, finta, for your helpful reply.

    For the sake of curiosity, I find your expression I bolded very interesting.
    I presume it means it wouldn't be regarded as the noble/refined/standard English, right?

    Furthermore, what is the difference between treat-or-trick and treat-or-tricking? trick-or-treat and trick-or-treating

    Last, what idea does with that try to convey?
    I will answer for Finta

    His bolded expression means it is not 100% proper English by British standards...but then most informal of British English used today does not pass that test either.

    Trick-or-treat is what children say when they appear at a door during Halloween. Literally it means give me a treat or I will play a trick on you. However the "trick" part is rarely done nowadays. Trick-or-treating is the act of going out on Halloween.

    With that means the same thing as after that or whereupon.

  3. angliholic's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: he had to work holidays

    Quote Originally Posted by Naamplao View Post
    I will answer for Finta

    His bolded expression means it is not 100% proper English by British standards...but then most informal of British English used today does not pass that test either.

    Trick-or-treat is what children say when they appear at a door during Halloween. Literally it means give me a treat or I will play a trick on you. However the "trick" part is rarely done nowadays. Trick-or-treating is the act of going out on Halloween.

    With that means the same thing as after that or whereupon.
    Thanks, Naamplao, for the transparent reply.
    I get it now.

    P.S.

    We mistimed our last posts and I didn't know it until just now.

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