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  1. Lenka's Avatar

    • Join Date: May 2004
    • Posts: 863
    #1

    of Sir John's

    I have seen this sentence: (btw: is this sentence I have just written written correct and right? I still have big problem with using present perfect :) )

    So here is the sentence: ....a friend of Sir John's.
    Can you tell me why there is " 's " at the end of John ?
    D we have to use " 's " always? I mean for exmple: This is a table of my grandmother's. Is it right?

    Lenka

  2. #2

    Re: of Sir John's

    Hi Lenka,

    [quote="Lenka"]I have seen this sentence: (btw: is this sentence I have just written written correct and right? I still have big problem with using present perfect :) )

    Your present perfect seems just fine.

    So here is the sentence: ....a friend of Sir John's.
    Can you tell me why there is " 's " at the end of John ?
    D we have to use " 's " always? I mean for exmple: This is a table of my grandmother's. Is it right?
    In spite of the fact that this 's' in "John's" seems to be unnecessary there, it is very widely used. It is called 'double possessive'. In your example, the meaning would be the same without an 's', but in other cases it is very helpful. For example:

    "A picture of my sister"....here the meaning is ambiguous. You do not know whether it is your sister that is seen in a picture, or it is a picture belonging to your sister. That is why it is better to say, 'A picture of my sister's' so you know that it is your sister's picture.

    Iza

  3. Lenka's Avatar

    • Join Date: May 2004
    • Posts: 863
    #3
    Which one is right?:
    ....of mine
    or ....of myself

    Lenka

    • Member Info
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    • Join Date: Nov 2002
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    #4
    It depends- they are both possible:

    He's a friend of mine. (possessive)

    The second is used by some, but I don't like it:
    It's a picture of myself and my sisiter.

    Here, I'd use 'me', but some speakers use it.

  4. Lenka's Avatar

    • Join Date: May 2004
    • Posts: 863
    #5
    Thanks for your answer. And could we say: Heís a friend of me. ?
    I understand that mine is used like this: He isnít your friend, he is mine!, but I donít understand that I can use it as you said, like heís a friend of mine. Is there a logical explanation or should I have to remember it?

    Lenka


    • Join Date: Jun 2004
    • Posts: 1,369
    #6
    And could we say: Heís a friend of me. ?
    I don't think so. "He's a friend of mine" is correct, and called doubel genitive.

    Quote Originally Posted by AH Book of English
    It can help sort out ambiguous phrases like Bobís photograph, which could mean either ďa photograph of BobĒ (i.e., revealing Bobís image) or ďa photograph that is in Bobís possession.Ē A photograph of Bobís, on the other hand, can only be a photo that Bob has in his possession and may or may not show Bobís image. Moreover, in some sentences the double genitive offers the only way to express what is meant. There is no substitute for it in a sentence such as Thatís the only friend of yours that Iíve ever met, since sentences such as Thatís your only friend that Iíve ever met and Thatís your only friend, whom Iíve ever met are not grammatical.
    FRC

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