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    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 16
    #1

    the and thee

    Can anybody tell me if there,s any difference in pronounciation of "the" on some places. I,ve heard sometimes it's pronounced as "thee" and sometimes the. Please tell me where does it change?


    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 242
    #2

    Re: the and thee

    As a general rule:
    If we dont wan't to stress it, we say th uh before a consonant and th ee before a vowel.
    If you want to put stress on the word, you would usually say th ee.


    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 16
    #3

    Re: the and thee

    Thank you Niall, but can you give an example where we put stress on word and pronounce the as thee.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #4

    Re: the and thee

    It was the[th ee]experience of my life = you are stressing that this was the most important experience.


    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 16
    #5

    Re: the and thee

    Thank you Anglika. It's quite clear to me now.
    Last edited by bozi; 31-Oct-2007 at 18:24.


    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 2
    #6

    Re: the and thee

    I am not an English teacher, but hope I can help clarify the use of the and thee.

    There are exceptions to the use of th ee before a vowel. When the vowel sounds like a consonant, you would say th u. For example, you would say "He's the [th u] one."
    The use of th ee before the vowel sound is intended to avoid an uncomfortable pause between words.


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 24
    #7

    Re: the and thee

    I was taught to use thee only because of the pause.


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 1,571
    #8

    Re: the and thee

    Quote Originally Posted by ClaytonM View Post
    I am not an English teacher, but hope I can help clarify the use of the and thee.

    There are exceptions to the use of th ee before a vowel. When the vowel sounds like a consonant, you would say th u. For example, you would say "He's the [th u] one."
    The use of th ee before the vowel sound is intended to avoid an uncomfortable pause between words.
    Excuse me for interfering, but a vowel is not a letter, it's a sound. And in the word 'one' the first sound is 'w', which is a consonant. So this example is no exception.

  1. tzfujimino's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Dec 2007
    • Posts: 2,697
    #9

    Re: the and thee

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    Excuse me for interfering, but a vowel is not a letter, it's a sound. And in the word 'one' the first sound is 'w', which is a consonant. So this example is no exception.
    Yes, I agree with you.
    Vowels, in many cases, coincide with alphabets ; a, e, i ,o ,u.
    However, there are some exceptions, such as..."one" or...."united."
    I think that's what ClaytonM meant by "...sounds like a consonant."
    Maybe I'm wrong...


    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 2
    #10

    Re: the and thee

    Yes, tzfujimino, that's what I meant, its the sound thats important. So, Clark you are right, I was wrong to use the word "exception".
    Perhaps the Glossary Definition for Vowel could be improved to say something like "although Y and O can also behave as consonants when at the beginning of a word."

    Vowels - Glossary Definition - UsingEnglish.com

    I would be interested if anyone knows any other cases where A,E,I,O, or U can behave as consonants at the beginning of a word.

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