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    • Join Date: Sep 2006
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    #1

    at/in the end, arrive to/at

    Hi,

    I don't understand when I should use "end" preceded by either in or at and "arrive" followed by either to or at.
    I thought that "arrive to" was always to a place like "I arrived to Barcelona" but it isn't always the case such as in "I arrived at a concert".
    Is there any rule or explanation that I could take into consideration when using the prepositions mentioned after "arrive" and "end"?

    Thanks

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    #2

    Re: at/in the end, arrive to/at

    Quote Originally Posted by silviasabater_2000 View Post
    Hi,

    I don't understand when I should use "end" preceded by either in or at and "arrive" followed by either to or at.
    I thought that "arrive to" was always to a place like "I arrived to Barcelona" but it isn't always the case such as in "I arrived at a concert".
    Is there any rule or explanation that I could take into consideration when using the prepositions mentioned after "arrive" and "end"?

    Thanks
    It depends on what information you wish to follow the verb "arrive".


    You arrive "at" [a town].

    I arrived at Barcelona
    .

    You can arrive "in [literally "inside the borders of" a town].

    I arrived in Barcelona.


    Something can arrive "by" [mail/the post].

    Something can arrive "on" [time].

    Someone can arrive "with" [friends]

    Something can arrive "from" [somewhere else/another town.]

    Someone can arrive "for" [dinner.]

    Someone can not arrive "until" [he completes whatever he is doing first].

    Someone can arrive "within" [time for dinner].

    Someone can arrive "before" [something occurs].

    Someone can arrive "after" [something occurs].

    Someone can arrive "as" [something is occuring].

    Someone can arrive "during" [dinner].

    Someone/Something can arrive "without" [warning]

    Someone can arrive "between" [9AM and 5PM].

    Someone can arrive "to" [do something].

    Someone can wait to arrive "till/until" [5 O'clock].

    Someone can arrive "in search of " [something]. (This is a prepositional phrase, not a true preposition, but I used it since it was in the list.)

    Someone can arrive "outside" of [your home (some place)].

    Something can arrive "out of the blue" (unexpected]


    source:Preposition: ... arrive <at, to, ?> - WordReference Forums


    in the end = finally

    In the end, I understood what he meant.

    at the end [ of the book/street/year/month, etc.]
    Last edited by Teia; 03-Nov-2007 at 22:53.

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