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    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 1
    #11

    Re: 'no one' vs 'noone'

    I found this thread after a quick Google search to convince my friend that "noone" is the incorrect usage. It's something I've noticed quite a few native speakers using, despite it being wrong.

    I suspect that people are familiar with "nobody" being a single word, so because "no one" means essentially the same thing they assume it also should be a single word.

    I'm sure Peter Noone would appreciate people getting it right!

  1. seba_870701's Avatar

    • Join Date: Feb 2007
    • Posts: 284
    #12

    Re: 'no one' vs 'noone'

    Quote Originally Posted by Cartroo View Post
    I found this thread after a quick Google search to convince my friend that "noone" is the incorrect usage. It's something I've noticed quite a few native speakers using, despite it being wrong.

    I suspect that people are familiar with "nobody" being a single word, so because "no one" means essentially the same thing they assume it also should be a single word.

    I'm sure Peter Noone would appreciate people getting it right!
    Welcome to the forum Cartroo


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 29
    #13

    Re: 'no one' vs 'noone'

    I agree with Cartroo. People learn:
    some one --> someone
    any one --> anyone
    no body --> nobody

    and naturally assume
    no one --> noone

  2. Amigos4's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Academic
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 82,532
    #14

    Re: 'no one' vs 'noone'

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    Given that you're in Poland and I'd have to guess that your classmates are other ESLs, then likely, it's simply it's a mistake.





    I agree, to some degree, David, but teachers often make mistakes for they too are human. I used to practice making mistakes in order to get my students to realize that we teachers are human and there is a way to tell a teacher that they made an error without it being considered a major faux pas.

    Regarding 'noone', ESLs also have to realize just what it is, a transcribed account of how we actually say some things in some situations.

    Noone are going to go with me! I'm going alone, GOT IT?

    Now, I'm sure that all will forgive you for the slip with <its> / <it's> but there's no way on god's green earth that we'll ever let you forget,

    'typos"!


    ;)
    Riverkid,

    "I used to practice making mistakes in order to get my students to realize that we teachers are human and there is a way to tell a teacher that they made an error without it being considered a major faux pas."

    In trying to be 'human', I'm sure that you meant to type: ... there's no way on God's green earth that we'll ever let you forget..."

    Amen, brother!

    Cheers,
    Amigos4




    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 1
    #15

    Re: 'no one' vs 'noone'

    Shouldn't it be: The audience came to their feet?

  3. Newbie
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Oman
      • Current Location:
      • Oman

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 8
    #16

    Re: 'no one' vs 'noone'

    Hi guys,
    A new member.. anyone to welcome me??
    Yeah, bro. I myself have faced this problem when learning English. But it was a matter of time.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 4
    #17

    Re: 'no one' vs 'noone'

    Quote Originally Posted by Omania View Post
    Hi guys,
    A new member.. anyone to welcome me??
    Yeah, bro. I myself have faced this problem when learning English. But it was a matter of time.

    Hi Omania . u are welcomed .


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1
    #18

    Re: 'no one' vs 'noone'

    Quote Originally Posted by Jono123 View Post
    Shouldn't it be: The audience came to their feet?
    No, because the people in the audience are being referred to collectively; every person in the audience got out of their chairs, thus "The audience came to its feet" is correct. If only some people got up you could say "Some members of the audience came to their feet".
    Last edited by Drifteroni; 10-Aug-2009 at 10:19. Reason: clarity

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