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    #1

    Using "here" to start a sentence

    My professor today said it is bad practice to start a sentence with the word "here," such as: "Here is an example." Do you agree? I disagree with the professor. Rob


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    #2

    Re: Using "here" to start a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by EMAIL REMOVED - Send PM to This User Instead View Post
    My professor today said it is bad practice to start a sentence with the word "here," such as: "Here is an example." Do you agree? I disagree with the professor. Rob
    I know that "Here is an example." is a commonly used phrase. In speaking English this would be perfectly fine. "Here we go again!" and "Here comes the police!" are other common speaking English sentences.


    In Writing English, unless I was trying to copy street speech, I would probably find another way to start a sentence.

    You have not explained the context of the situation when the professor made this comment.

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    #3

    Re: Using "here" to start a sentence

    Here is (ha!) the context, in 2 short para. from the essay. I recieved a high grade, but a negative comment on my use of the word "here" to star the sentence of the second para. I think it's use in this context adds emphasis to the other explanation, and accentuates the importance of the other explanation.

    "It is easy to conclude, as many do many authors (e.g. Eagly and Carli), that prejudice is the only explanation for the disparate treatment of men and women in conversations. Between persons who are not familiar with each other, prejudice might be correct more often than not. But I do not believe it is necessary to assume a person is acting with prejudice simply because of their reaction to a conversational approach. For example, Jewish women from NY who interrupt a lot are not “pushy” (Tanner 207-210), and sometimes a constant interruption means you are “talking on the same team” (Tanner 194). So my mind remains open for other explanations.
    Here is one of those possible explanations. I believe that our acceptance of communication from people with whom we are familiar, like Sue and the engineer, has less to do with prejudice and more to do with whether we like how that person is treating us. I tend to think that relationship-builders who dabble, as did Sue, into a power-grabbing conversational approach are often just bad at doing it, and the other person has a bad reaction. The engineer is not prejudice. Rather, he just does not like to be on the business end of a poorly delivered power approach. "


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    #4

    Re: Using "here" to start a sentence

    Personally I would have no problems with its use in this context. However, since a more formal expression was expected, perhaps "One of those possible other explanations is as follows: ..."


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    #5

    Re: Using "here" to start a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by EMAIL REMOVED - Send PM to This User Instead View Post
    Here is (ha!) the context, in 2 short para. from the essay. I recieved a high grade, but a negative comment on my use of the word "here" to star the sentence of the second para. I think it's use in this context adds emphasis to the other explanation, and accentuates the importance of the other explanation.

    "It is easy to conclude, as many do many authors (e.g. Eagly and Carli), that prejudice is the only explanation for the disparate treatment of men and women in conversations. Between persons who are not familiar with each other, prejudice might be correct more often than not. But I do not believe it is necessary to assume a person is acting with prejudice simply because of their reaction to a conversational approach. For example, Jewish women from NY who interrupt a lot are not “pushy” (Tanner 207-210), and sometimes a constant interruption means you are “talking on the same team” (Tanner 194). So my mind remains open for other explanations.

    Here is one of those possible explanations. I believe that our acceptance of communication from people with whom we are familiar, like Sue and the engineer, has less to do with prejudice and more to do with whether we like how that person is treating us. I tend to think that relationship-builders who dabble, as did Sue, into a power-grabbing conversational approach are often just bad at doing it, and the other person has a bad reaction. The engineer is not prejudice. Rather, he just does not like to be on the business end of a poorly delivered power approach. "
    Your professor is trying to improve your writing. I think you should accept his criticism for that reason. The use of the word "here" is weak in comparison to the rest of your writing. It is not that it is wrong per se, rather it is just that there are better ways of saying what you want to say.

    Anglika has suggested a good alternative phrase that fits in well with the formal nature of what you have written. Another alternative might be to combine your first two sentences in this manner:

    Of those possible explanations, I believe that our acceptance of communication from people......

    Don't take this criticism too personally. You have written a pretty good piece and from the sounds of it you received a decent grade for your work. Your professor was correct in his criticism though perhaps he could have said it differently. Keep up the good work....and be open to change

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    #6

    Re: Using "here" to start a sentence

    Thank you so much! I will accept the professor's advice ... unless I disagree again. Kidding!


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    #7

    Re: Using "here" to start a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by EMAIL REMOVED - Send PM to This User Instead View Post
    My professor today said it is bad practice to start a sentence with the word "here," such as: "Here is an example." Do you agree? I disagree with the professor. Rob
    I think that your professor is being overly pedantic. There are more formal, more felicitous collocations that could be used, but "bad practice", I don't think so.

    Don't simply accept anyone's advice on language without a reasonable explanation for there is a great deal of worthless information offered on language.

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    #8

    Re: Using "here" to start a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    I think that your professor is being overly pedantic. There are more formal, more felicitous collocations that could be used, but "bad practice", I don't think so.

    Don't simply accept anyone's advice on language without a reasonable explanation for there is a great deal of worthless information offered on language.
    Here comes the girl. Here come the girls. Here is your thing. Here are your things.

    The above examples demonstrate where the subject is, and that "here" is used as an adverb. So the sentences are like inverted statements, with the adverb coming before the verb and subject. (Note: Certain adverbs come before the simple present tense, as in: I usually wake early.)

    Your prof's objection may be for this reason -- like putting the cart before the horse, using inverted statements "loosely". He may also be frowning on putting an adverb before the verb BE. However, IMHO, to say that it is bad practice to start a sentence with "here" is too sweeping.

    In writing, what is placed as the subject, or at the head of a sentence, makes a difference to the focus, clarity or effectiveness of the message. , For example: "Drink lots of water when you have a cold" vs. "When you have a cold, drink lots of water". Thus, inverted statements are used for a deliberate purpose: Here are your things vs. Your things are here.

    IMHO again, I agree with riverkid -- a questioning mind is very important despite the possibility that it may be misconstrued as not taking criticism.
    Last edited by justinwschang; 12-Nov-2007 at 01:51. Reason: Change "Soup" to "riverkid", oops!


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    #9

    Re: Using "here" to start a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by justinwschang View Post
    Here comes the girl. Here come the girls. Here is your thing. Here are your things.

    Your prof's objection may be for this reason -- like putting the cart before the horse, using inverted statements "loosely". He may also be frowning on putting an adverb before the verb BE. However, IMHO, to say that it is bad practice to start a sentence with "here" is too sweeping.

    IMHO again, I agree with riverkid -- a questioning mind is very important despite the possibility that it may be misconstrued as not taking criticism.
    I am going to defend the professor here.

    Your examples that I highlighted above are certainly acceptable basic English. No one is disputing that. But such constructions are not the best when writing a formal piece of writing.

    If the writer of this piece was a beginner or even intermediate, as a teacher you would probably overlook this construction as there would be more important writing issues to deal with.

    However, robpioli, is beyond that level, so now the criticism becomes finer and finer in a further effort to improve his formal writing.

    The use of the word "here" in that sentence is weak. Especially when you compare this sentence to the rest of his writing. That point should be obvious to you if you teach/correct formal writing. There are other ways to write that sentence. I suggested one and Anglika suggested another.

    You certainly would not use such language in a Master's or Phd thesis or a formal engineering proposal. Yes, I know, I know that this is not such a document but when does he learn how to fine tune his writing.....I suggest that he is ready for such instruction and his teacher made a suitable criticism of his work.

    Did he give him a bad mark? I don't think so. The prof made a constructive criticism which should be listened to.

    If you write for a living you will have to deal with such copy editors for most of your professional life. Rewrites are the stock in this trade. You cannot take it personally.

    I applaud the professor's suggestion that this area could be improved. I would much rather get such constructive criticism compared to the usual "very good", "excellent", "could be better" or worse still the check mark that makes you wonder if he read the writing at all.

    Sure....take the advice or leave it....but don't slag a teacher who is doing his/her job...and reasonably well from the look of it.

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    #10

    Re: Using "here" to start a sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Naamplao View Post
    I am going to defend the professor here.

    Sure....take the advice or leave it....but don't slag a teacher who is doing his/her job...and reasonably well from the look of it.
    N, I think you would be defending the point made by the prof, not the prof. Nobody's slagging him (her?) as far as I know.

    You made some good points on the point about formal writing.

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