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    • Join Date: Jul 2006
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    #1

    bloom and blossom

    What is the difference in meaning between bloom and blossom?
    Frankly, I see no difference between them but I'm afraid there is a difference.
    Last edited by Englishlanguage; 07-Nov-2007 at 13:41.


    • Join Date: Feb 2007
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    #2

    Re: bloom and blossom

    Quote Originally Posted by Englishlanguage View Post
    Which is the difference in meaning between bloom and blossom?
    Frankly, I see no difference between them but I'm afraid there is a difference.
    In some respects these two nouns are interchangeable, they are both flowers, they are both a part of the reproductive system of plants (Well....usually)) I understand blossom to be the flowers on fruit trees which will eventually develope into fruit. Apple, cherry, may, rose, pear, peach etc. Blooms I think are more flowers you may find in your garden...dahlia, pelargonia, iris etc.


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
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    #3

    Re: bloom and blossom

    Thank you very much.
    So I had the right feeling. But I think I won't deepen into the subject because I'm not at all an expert on flowers.


    • Join Date: Feb 2007
    • Posts: 175
    #4

    Re: bloom and blossom

    Quote Originally Posted by Englishlanguage View Post
    Thank you very much.
    So I had the right feeling. But I think I won't deepen into the subject because I'm not at all an expert on flowers.
    You're welcome! I'm no expert either, but that much I do know.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #5

    Re: bloom and blossom

    As nouns, both are rather pedantic or poetic in use. You won't hear many people saying "Oh, do look at those lovely blooms" or "She has such pretty blossoms in her garden" - we generally just say flower unless talking specifically about apple/pear/cherry/almond/peach blossom.

    As verbs, they are more commonly used. "The rose blooms in the summer"'; "She blossomed under his tuition".


    • Join Date: Feb 2007
    • Posts: 175
    #6

    Re: bloom and blossom

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    As nouns, both are rather pedantic or poetic in use. You won't hear many people saying "Oh, do look at those lovely blooms" or "She has such pretty blossoms in her garden" - we generally just say flower unless talking specifically about apple/pear/cherry/almond/peach blossom.

    As verbs, they are more commonly used. "The rose blooms in the summer"'; "She blossomed under his tuition".
    I take it you don't come from the north of England anglika!

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
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    #7

    Re: bloom and blossom

    "In bloom" and "in blossom" are not uncommon:

    1. The roses are in bloom.
    2. The apple trees are in blossom.

    It seems to me that in ordinary usage, "bloom" and "blossom" tend to relate to certain kinds of flower: smaller, flimsier flowers like those of fruit trees in the latter case, and larger, showier flowers like those of camellias, roses, etc. in the former.

    MrP

    Not a professional ESL teacher.


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 449
    #8

    Re: bloom and blossom

    Quote Originally Posted by moggy View Post
    I take it you don't come from the north of England anglika!
    I guess the likelihood of hearing bloom and blossom as nouns depends on where you are.
    It would be interesting to know where it's more likely to be heard. Why don't you native speakers tell us whether you hear it in use or not and where are you from?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Feb 2005
    • Posts: 2,585
    #9

    Re: bloom and blossom

    Hello EL,

    In southern England, I hear the noun "blossom" quite often, in the spring. The noun "bloom" I hear less often; my own impression is that whereas "blossom" is a straightforward descriptive term, and the inevitable word to use in the context of flowering fruit trees, etc., the noun "bloom" has evaluative connotations, and thus indicates the speaker's attitude towards the flower in question.

    Best wishes,

    MrP

    Not a professional ESL teacher.

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