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  1. angliholic's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile My back really aches!

    My back really hurts/aches.



    I reckon that both hurts and aches work with the above wording, but do they convey the same idea? Thanks.


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    #2

    Re: My back really aches!

    Not quite.

    An ache is a nagging sensation which is not exactly pain, but is uncomfortable.

    Hurting implies there is pain.

  2. angliholic's Avatar
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    #3

    Smile Re: My back really aches!

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Not quite.

    An ache is a nagging sensation which is not exactly pain, but is uncomfortable.

    Hurting implies there is pain.
    Thanks, Anglika.
    But I still don't get it--An ache is not exactly pain, but what about "headache; stomachache?"
    By the way, is it close semantically to "My back is really sore!"


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    #4

    Re: My back really aches!

    Pain is highly subjective - one person's intense pain is another person's ache. Generally an ache is a continuous or prolonged dull pain.

    Both headaches and stomach-aches are generally and characteristically not acute and sharp pain, but persistent and uncomfortable pain.

    Something that is sore is painful. It is also generally a persistent pain rather than a sudden and acute pain.

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    #5

    Re: My back really aches!

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Pain is highly subjective - one person's intense pain is another person's ache. Generally an ache is a continuous or prolonged dull pain.

    Both headaches and stomach-aches are generally and characteristically not acute and sharp pain, but persistent and uncomfortable pain.

    Something that is sore is painful. It is also generally a persistent pain rather than a sudden and acute pain.

    hi,

    so, if i hit a toe on the edge of a bed, for example, what should i say?

    "my foot is in pain"

    "i feel pain"

    thanks


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    #6

    Re: My back really aches!

    Ouch, I've hurt my foot!

  3. angliholic's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: My back really aches!

    Got it. Thanks, Anglika.

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