Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. Unregistered
    Guest
    #1

    Ms.C.Clarke

    What's the proper 'term' for using 'Yours sincerely' & 'Yours faithfully'? ie.closure?


    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 554
    #2

    Re: Ms.C.Clarke

    If i have understood your question correctly the term you are looking for is -

    complementary close

    so called because it complements the salutation


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #3

    Re: Ms.C.Clarke

    I understood them to be complimentary closings - expressing the esteem you have for the person addressed.


    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 554
    #4

    Re: Ms.C.Clarke

    No, definitely complementary close. They come in pairs.

    Dear Sir(s), Dear Madam etc. (when we don't know the name) is used with Yours faithfully

    while

    Dear Julie, Dear John or Dear Mr Smith (we do know the name) is used with Yours sincerely


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #5

    Re: Ms.C.Clarke

    Quote Originally Posted by Horsa View Post
    No, definitely complementary close. They come in pairs.

    Dear Sir(s), Dear Madam etc. (when we don't know the name) is used with Yours faithfully

    while

    Dear Julie, Dear John or Dear Mr Smith (we do know the name) is used with Yours sincerely
    I think you will need to look at these [there are many more if you google "complimentary close"]

    Complimentary close - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Business Writing: Is "Best" a Complimentary Close?

    Definition of complimentary close - Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary


    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 554
    #6

    Re: Ms.C.Clarke

    I googled both we have a difference between British and American spellings again!

    Having said that the usage is very mixed I found US government and US university sites which were using the traditional British spelling and British sites using the American spelling. I guess I'm getting old I hadn't realised there were 2 acceptable ways to spell this. I also rechecked the British books that I have on commercial correspondence they all, unsurprisingly, use complementary but I'm sure their American equivalents will be using complimentary so take your pick.

    So I learned something too from this. Thanks!


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #7

    Re: Ms.C.Clarke

    I came the the conclusion that one uses a complimentary close that is complementary to the greeting.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •