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    #1

    Relaxing or relaxation

    I have a sentence :
    After a hard working day, Mary often listens to music. It is_____
    a) relaxing
    b)relaxation
    What choice should we make? and how come?

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    #2

    Re: Relaxing or relaxation

    It’s relaxing means it’s soothing & relieving. ‘Relaxing’ is a predicative adjective here modifying the expletive ‘It’. ‘Relaxation’ is a noun. It would be okay if you say ‘It’s a form of relaxation for her.’


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    #3

    Re: Relaxing or relaxation

    The first is correct, and the most usual way of expressing this. "Relaxing" is the adjective, qualifying "it", the music.
    You could get away with saying, "It is relaxation" in casual speech, because you would in effect be saying 'relaxation'. Look at this sentence:
    Most people come home from work and plonk in front of the TV. Not her. She gets on and cleans out cupboards and what have you. It is 'relaxation', she says.


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    #4

    Re: Relaxing or relaxation

    Still not clear,
    You think what I think, David, but what is the different between: It's 'relaxation' with or without the ' ' ( I don't remember how to call it in English)

    @Buddaheart: Okay, relaxation is a noun, so what about the phrase:" That's life"? I never know that a noun cannot modify for "is"?


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    #5

    Re: Relaxing or relaxation

    That's life"? I never know that a noun cannot modify for "is"?
    Sorry. I don't know what you are asking me here, what you mean.


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    #6

    Re: Relaxing or relaxation

    That's life is an idiom
    I mean, nobody told me that a noun cannot stand after "to be"


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    #7

    Re: Relaxing or relaxation

    That is truth personified.

    That is nonsense.

    That's salami.

    There is no reason why you cannot use a noun after "to be".

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    #8

    Re: Relaxing or relaxation

    You’ve misunderstood. No one said a noun couldn’t be positioned after the verb ‘to be’. Your example "That's life.” is fine, so are those given by David L. & Anglika. The verb ‘is’ is a copula (or linking verb) and the noun ‘relaxation’ is the SC (subject complement) in ‘It is relaxation.’ This is the sentence pattern with linking verbs. The SC can be a noun (e.g. relaxation), an adjective (e.g. relaxing) or a noun-equivalent (e.g. I or me). In ‘It is relaxation.’ the subject (‘It’) is identified with the SC (‘relaxation’); in ‘It is relaxing.’ the subject is described with the adjective (‘relaxing’).

    Given the context in your sentence, ‘relaxing’ is the correct or most appropriate word.

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    #9

    Re: Relaxing or relaxation

    Quote Originally Posted by Buddhaheart View Post
    You’ve misunderstood. No one said a noun couldn’t be positioned after the verb ‘to be’. Your example "That's life.” is fine, so are those given by David L. & Anglika. The verb ‘is’ is a copula (or linking verb) and the noun ‘relaxation’ is the SC (subject complement) in ‘It is relaxation.’ This is the sentence pattern with linking verbs. The SC can be a noun (e.g. relaxation), an adjective (e.g. relaxing) or a noun-equivalent (e.g. I or me). In ‘It is relaxation.’ the subject (‘It’) is identified with the SC (‘relaxation’); in ‘It is relaxing.’ the subject is described with the adjective (‘relaxing’).

    Given the context in your sentence, ‘relaxing’ is the correct or most appropriate word.
    IMHO, if we put the words in context, the question poster may have a clearer picture of how to use these two words"
    1st scenario
    John, after having a spa, says, "Oh, how relaxing it is. I'm loving it."
    (Here, relaxing means something makes you feel relaxed.)

    2nd scenario
    Meditation allows you to enter a state of deep relaxation.
    (And here, relaxation means a way of resting and enjoying yourself.)

    As you see, "relaxing" (an adjective) and "relaxation" (a noun) are used in different contexts.


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    #10

    Re: Relaxing or relaxation

    ...but what is the different between: It's 'relaxation' with or without the ' '

    and

    The SC can be a noun (e.g. relaxation), an adjective (e.g. relaxing) or a noun-equivalent (e.g. I or me). In ‘It is relaxation.’ the subject (‘It’) is identified with the SC (‘relaxation’).


    I'm the one who's caused the confusion here, so let me try to haul myself out!
    When I gave the example, It is 'relaxation', she says, I incorrectly placed "relaxation" in single instead of double quotation marks, that is, 'relaxation'. In that sentence, "relaxation" is reported speech. "Relaxation" just happens to be a noun, but when we are reporting speech, the word/s quoted might be any part of speech. For example:
    He: The writing is smudged. What is the word after "dog"?
    She: It is "is".

    (Both sentences indicate that someone is speaking, but I have left out the quotation marks around the sentences so that what I am trying to get across is clearer.)
    So, it would not be correct to say, It is relaxation. (again omitting the double quotation marks so it is clear.)
    Last edited by David L.; 16-Nov-2007 at 04:49.

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