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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
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      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 86
    #1

    breakfast, dinner and tea

    Hello, I am writing this after several months.

    I got a question about the meaning of "tea" in the below sentence.

    They ate KitKats for breakfast, dinner and tea.

    What does that "tea" mean?
    I suppose tea has the meaning of dinner in Britain but if the "tea" should have that meaning, it would sound odd, because it comes after "dinner and."
    Or is it about the drink?

    I appreciate your help.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: breakfast, dinner and tea

    The names of meals in England vary regionally and socially.

    Breakfast = first meal of the day

    Lunch / Dinner = main meal, usually taken around midday

    Tea = light meal, usually tea with a sweet biscuit/cake, taken around 4.00pm-6.00pm. However, the name is also used in some regions to mean the evening meal >> Supper/Dinner = meal taken in the mid-evening.

    In your example it is the light afternoon meal that is intended.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 86
    #3

    Re: breakfast, dinner and tea

    Thank you, Anglica.

    I'd thought that all British people used the word "tea" for dinner.
    Now I understand it depends.
    However, it still seems a bit strange to me because the order of the three words is not, say, chronological(I'm not sure which word to use).

    For example, if the order is breakfast, tea and dinner, then it would
    sound quite natural to me because you usually have tea between breakfast and dinner.

    I searched for the phrase "breakfast, dinner and tea" on google and I found quite many. Would you possibly use "breakfast, tea and dinner" in the sentence I wrote on my first thread?

    Thank you for your help.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #4

    Re: breakfast, dinner and tea

    I think you can use it either way - there is no real semantic difference, and these things are not always logically expressed. If you google them as selected phrases, you will find there is pretty much a balance between the two.

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