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    #1

    gerund and infinitive

    Hi teachers,

    Could you please explain to me the difference in the following two sentences?

    Don't forget shutting the windows when you leave the home.
    Don't forget to shut the windows when you leave the home.

    Thank you in advance for your efforts.

    V


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    #2

    Re: gerund and infinitive

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Hi teachers,

    Could you please explain to me the difference in the following two sentences?

    Don't forget shutting the windows when you leave the home.
    Don't forget to shut the windows when you leave the home.

    Thank you in advance for your efforts.

    V
    Some verbs can take both a gerund and an infinitive after them. Some take only a gerund and some take only an infinitive. There are no real rules to this you must memorize them or understand how a native English speaker hears a phrase (we say it sounds right or wrong) which we find difficult to explain.

    The first sentence doesn't sound quite correct to me. So I think that "forget" takes the infinitive after it. The second sentence is better and it is the one I would say normally.

    The first sentence is understandable and would mean the same as the second...it is just awkward to say, it is for me anyway.

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    #3

    Re: gerund and infinitive

    Hi Naamplao,

    Thanks for your prompt reply.

    For your information, there is written the following principal in my book:

    It is sometimes possible to find a reason for the use of a given form. With some verbs and word-groups, such as to be afraid, to forget, to hate(dislike), to prefer the infinitive is mostly used with reference to a specific occasion, the gerund being more appropriate to a general statement.

    The first sentence concerns a general statement, while the second concerns a special occasion: "it is very windy today".

    Another example:

    I don't like interrupting people.(in general, on principle)
    I don't like to interrupt him. (he seems very busy)

    Thank you again for your responsiveness.

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 17-Nov-2007 at 15:47.

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    #4

    Re: gerund and infinitive

    hi,

    what is the correct form?

    "would you mind to take my picture?"

    "would you mind taking my picture?"

    thanks!
    jc

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    #5

    Re: gerund and infinitive

    Dear ictgt,

    Sorry. I'm not a teacher, because of I couldn't give you a 100% true answer. You have to hear answer from a knowledgeable teacher or NES.

    I might quote the following excerpt from my grammar book:

    "With the verbs and verbal phrases: to avoid, to burst out, to deny, to enjoy, to fancy(in imperative sentences as an exclamation of surprise), to finish, to forgive, to give up, to go on, to keep (on), to leave off, to mind (in negative and interrogative sentences), to postpone, to put off, cannot help, and some others.

    Do you mind my asking you one or two more questions?
    Would you mind waiting a week or two?
    I don't mind going and seeing her."

    As you see the first sentence is wrong. I say over an over, I'm not a teacher. I'm student like you and that is in my poor opinion . You have to hear the standpoint of a expert.

    Regards.

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 17-Nov-2007 at 15:48.


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    #6

    Re: gerund and infinitive

    That is very impressive Vil, particularly in that you seem to have mastered that the possessive pronoun goes before a verbal noun (gerund). It grates on my ears when I hear people saying, "Do you mind me asking..." In effect, the speaker is asking, do I mind them; and my reaction is to say, yes, when you mangle grammar like that! (lol)
    In your very first sentence, you would in effect be saying, "Don't forget the shutting of windows when you leave home." That's both a mouthful and stilted; and when we leave some of the words out for brevity, it strikes one as very odd and bad grammar. In normal speech, use the 'don't forget to shut...'

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    #7

    Re: gerund and infinitive

    Hi David L,

    Thank you for your immediate and telling reaction.

    I'm sorry for your super sensible ears. I see what you mean, but I take a different view of things. Please see my previous post. "I might quote the following excerpt from my grammar book: " This repugnant (regarding your opinion) example isn't my "product". It is a product of a venerable English grammar expert, who have written an English grammar book, which is lying just now on my desk, laughing in it's sleeve. As matter of fact, it turn out that this grammar book is a machine for pressing fabrics by means of heated rollers (a clothes wringer). I have to throw it out of the window.

    Thank you for the sharing the new for me word "mangle". Now, by virtue of that word, I learned more and yet more new words, as: mutilate, disfigure, batter, hack, tear, ruin, spoil.

    Thank you for the recommendation regarding my very first example (which is also from the same grammar book). I will try to follow your "admonitions".

    Thank you again for your perspicacity.

    In spite of all, I read your last post with the greatest pleasure. Your post gave me a kick.

    Regards.

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 17-Nov-2007 at 15:50.


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    #8

    Re: gerund and infinitive

    Vil:
    You seem to be under the impression I am strongly disagreeing with you about something, which, for the life of me, I can't fathom (grasp). May I trouble you to enlighten me?


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    #9

    Re: gerund and infinitive

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    That is very impressive Vil, particularly in that you seem to have mastered that the possessive pronoun goes before a verbal noun (gerund). It grates on my ears when I hear people saying, "Do you mind me asking..." In effect, the speaker is asking, do I mind them; and my reaction is to say, yes, when you mangle grammar like that! (lol)
    David,

    Clearly, the speaker is not asking, "Do you mind me?". If the speaker were to stop at that point, your idea might make some sense.

    "Do you mind me asking ...?" means the same thing as, "Do you mind if I ask you ...?" or "Do you mind that I ask you ...?"

    "Do you mind me smoking?" equals "Do you mind if I smoke?" equals "Do you mind that I smoke?"

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    #10

    Re: gerund and infinitive

    Dear David L,

    Very likely there must be some misunderstanding. I must have made a mistake. After reading your previous post in this thread I was left with the impression that the written from me after intense drilling sentence "Do you mind my asking you one or two more questions?" is wrong, on account of what it was found that it presented great irritating factor for your ears. I was dumbfounded of the word "mangle" = "to mutilate or disfigure by battering, hacking, cutting, or tearing". I would not even that of such a thing that has something to do with me. This one was the reason for the gentle playful tone of my voice in my previous post. I hope you could fathom the complicate situation, in which I was gotten in. As a matter of fact, I have seen an imaginary quotations by the word "mastering" in your previous post.

    Nevertheless, I am sure, I have not crossed the deadline.

    Thank you for your staunchness.

    Regards.

    V

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