Results 1 to 9 of 9

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 16
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    Which is correct interpretation?

    "When someone approaches you for help or advice at work or you are asked to do a job not related to your area,you might have shrugged your shoulders and said that it is not your job or it is the responsibility of another department or simply said that you do not know anything about it".


    Above is the text taken from a news paper.My doubt in the above sentence is about the clause "you are asked to do a job not related to your area"

    How should the above phrase be interpreted?

    Interpretation1: Here the subject "you" has been asked to do a job not related to his area.

    Interpretaion2: Here the subject "you" is regulary being asked to do a job not related to his area.


    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 1,153
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: Which is correct interpretation?

    Quote Originally Posted by ssthrn View Post
    "When someone approaches you for help or advice at work or you are asked to do a job not related to your area,you might have shrugged your shoulders and said that it is not your job or it is the responsibility of another department or simply said that you do not know anything about it".


    Above is the text taken from a news paper.My doubt in the above sentence is about the clause "you are asked to do a job not related to your area"

    How should the above phrase be interpreted?

    Interpretation1: Here the subject "you" has been asked to do a job not related to his area.

    Interpretaion2: Here the subject "you" is regulary being asked to do a job not related to his area.
    It could be a one time situation or it could be a situation where the person is constantly asked to do something beyond their area of responsibility. There is nothing in the context of what you have given us to decide one way or the other.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: Which is correct interpretation?

    Perhaps part of the difficulty you are having in understanding this sentence, is that the writer has mixed his tenses.
    "When someone approaches you for help or advice at work or you are asked to do a job not related to your area, you might have shrugged your shoulders and said that it is not your job or it is the responsibility of another department or simply said that you do not know anything about it".
    Compare:
    A :"When someone approaches you ..... area,you might shrug your shoulders and say that it is not your job or it is the responsibility of another department or simply say that you do not know anything about it".

    B: "If someone has (ever) approached you for help or advice at work or you have been asked to do a job not related to your area, you might have shrugged your shoulders and said that it is not your job or it is the responsibility of another department or simply said that you do not know anything about it".


    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 16
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: Which is correct interpretation?

    Quote Originally Posted by Naamplao View Post
    It could be a one time situation or it could be a situation where the person is constantly asked to do something beyond their area of responsibility. There is nothing in the context of what you have given us to decide one way or the other.
    Hi Naamplao,

    What ever i have given you is the exact text that came in the news paper.But you said it that context does not say clearly which way it has to be interpreted.But don't you think that listener gets confused when such kind of sentences where in context clearly say that which way it has to be interpreted.I just want to know how do you native speakers generally deal with when such kind of sentences are used.


    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 1,153
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: Which is correct interpretation?

    Quote Originally Posted by ssthrn View Post
    Hi Naamplao,

    What ever i have given you is the exact text that came in the news paper.But you said it that context does not say clearly which way it has to be interpreted.But don't you think that listener gets confused when such kind of sentences where in context clearly say that which way it has to be interpreted.I just want to know how do you native speakers generally deal with when such kind of sentences are used.
    Hmmmm.....so, nothing else was said in the newspaper article?? I find that hard to believe. This sounds to me to be one sentence in a newspaper article.

    Above is the text taken from a news paper.My doubt in the above sentence is about the clause "you are asked to do a job not related to your area"

    How should the above phrase be interpreted?

    Interpretation1: Here the subject "you" has been asked to do a job not related to his area.

    Interpretaion2: Here the subject "you" is regulary being asked to do a job not related to his area.
    I suppose my response was with respect to your Interpretation #2. There is nothing in the context to suggest being asked regularly.

    Your interpretation #1 is just a restatement of the actual phrase. It is not an interpretation.

    "you are asked to do a job not related to your area"

    Perhaps you are confused by "your area". This actually means "your area of responsibility" or perhaps "your area of expertise". So you are being asked to do something that you are not being paid to do. Some people will not do any work that is not their responsibility, some do. Some people are nice about it and explain why they won't do it, some are indifferent and just walk away.

    There is a lot more to this newspaper discussion than what you have shown. Without this information it is not possible to understand what the writer ultimately wants to say.


    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 16
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: Which is correct interpretation?

    Hi Naamplao,

    Here is the link of the article i have seen.
    The Hindu : Opportunities / Working Trendz : Make your peers look to you

    I have cut pasted the article also below here.I was refering the first statement in the article in my question to you.

    Iam just confused about this phrase "you are asked to do a job not related to your area". Mainly i am confused of the clause "you are asked".Let my put it the same thing in more direct way using active voice.

    Is this cluase " you are asked" equivalent to the clause "he asks you" or "he asked you"

    "He asks you" means you are being asked regularly.It doesn't mean that you have been asked now and it shows that in general or regularly you are being asked.

    "He asked you" means you have been asked now and the action of asking is done.But it does not say that you are regularly being asked.It just says that now you have been asked.

    Consider the differnent phrase.

    We are given all the resources.Depending on the context same phrase can give the meaning either we got all the sources to execute the current project or in general it can mean that we get all the resources for every project we do.

    So my question to you is on the clause "you are asked".Iam confused a bit on which way it means.

    Hope i didn't confuse you much.

    Make your peers look to you










    When someone approaches you for help or advice at work or you are asked to do a job not related to your area, you might have shrugged your shoulders and said that it is not your job or it is the responsibility of another department or simply said that you do not know anything about it. It is sad but true that most employees do not want to be accountable. The spin offs are an irresponsive workforce that does not rise to the occasion and this results in the company’s s lowness in adapting to market changes or shifting customer demands. Consequently the company loses out to the competition, misses out valuable opportunities for growth and increasing profits.

    Lack of accountability can range from small matters like being late for a meeting or refusing to answer a phone call to major ones like not informing concerned departments about changes in company policies or withholding vital information from bosses. Whatever the lapse, it can do considerable damage to your reputation; others will lose trust and the faith in your ability to do your job well. The worst part is your attitude can be common even in co-workers and in due course the larger sphere of customers, vendors and others will start believing that the company as a whole lacks accountability.
    Those who show a lack of accountability use this as a self- defence technique to protect themselves form being blamed for any mistakes or taking up further responsibilities. It also insures them from accusations or criticism when things go wrong.
    The initiative to prevent this attitude can start with you; do not expect the top management to set an example or give the impetus. You can start by first changing your behaviour and trying to change the attitude in your department or at least of those who work with you. Go the extra mile and try your best to answer questions from people though it may not be related to your department. Instead of complaining about conditions at the workplace or the low turnover, pitch in and do your bit to improve the scenario. Volunteer to do extra work and be a part of committees that seek to bring changes. Keep your commitments and do what you have promised to do.
    Let others know about the initiatives you are taking and be open about it but be careful not to brag. Your example could probably inspire others to do the same. Spread the message that being accountable comes with working in a team. Make it clear that you are not doing this out of self-interest but for the overall benefit of the organisation. This may call for extra hard work from you but the rub off effect is others too will adopt your attitude and everyone will make efforts to be more accountable, communicative and helpful. These employee traits are vital for the success of the organisation.
    Being accountable also means being sensitive to the needs of others, when one of your co-workers comes to you seeking information, do not dismiss it by saying you do not know or say it is someone else’s job. Such responses may make the other person think of you as unresponsive and unhelpful. He had come to you seeking information because he believed you could help him; your failure to do so will break his trust and confidence in you. You have to live up to this confidence others have in you, otherwise you will be labelled as incompetent.
    Accountability means being alert to others’ needs. Listen carefully to decipher what colleagues and managers want and go out of your way to meet their expectations. You will be noticed and appreciated for your efforts. On a larger scale, a company that has employees who display accountability in their dealings with clients and customers win hands down over the competition, which does not have this quality. Employees who are accountable not just to themselves or their managers but also to the organisation and to clients or customers will take their company to greater heights and the initiative to adopt this trait can start with you.





    HEMA .G


    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 1,153
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: Which is correct interpretation?

    Quote Originally Posted by ssthrn View Post
    Hi Naamplao,

    Here is the link of the article i have seen.
    The Hindu : Opportunities / Working Trendz : Make your peers look to you

    I have cut pasted the article also below here.I was refering the first statement in the article in my question to you.

    Iam just confused about this phrase "you are asked to do a job not related to your area". Mainly i am confused of the clause "you are asked".Let my put it the same thing in more direct way using active voice.
    I see...well in this phrase "you are asked to do a job" there are a few implied words that have been left out of the phrase. What is really being said is

    you are asked (by someone) to do a job

    You could be asked once or many times. That is not the point. The "someone" could be your employer, a customer or just someone in general, again that is not the point the writer wants to make.

    The main point of discussion is that because of fear of being held accountable for their actions, employees refuse to extend themselves beyond their responsibilities. If they make a mistake then they are punished or censured somehow....so they do nothing. The writer thinks the loser in all this is the company since there is no incentive for imagination or initiative in its workforce... I happen to agree with this point of view.


    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 16
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8

    Re: Which is correct interpretation?

    Hi Naamplao,

    Sorry to bother you once again.But i have to ask you.

    I don't understand how come it does not make a point whether it is one time action(asking action) or a regular action.I feel like depening on how you treat the phrase the whole tense is changed.

    My confusion is basically triggered by the articile.Please see this link.

    Participial Adjectives II

    I would like to just quote the sentence of the above article which is of prime importance for me based on which my confusion lies.

    "It's not usually necessary to decide whether a phrase is a verb or be plus an adjective, and sometimes the line is very unclear. But note that the tense of the auxiliary/verb be is affected by whether the past participial is part of a passive verb phrase ("dynamic") or simply an adjective following the stative verb be :"

    Suppose if you to convert the following sentence to active voice whats the equivalent one.

    The sentence is :you are asked (by someone) to do a job

    Is the active voice equivalent is "some one asked you to do a job" or "some one asks you to do a job".





    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 1,153
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #9

    Re: Which is correct interpretation?

    Quote Originally Posted by ssthrn View Post
    Hi Naamplao,

    Sorry to bother you once again.But i have to ask you.

    I don't understand how come it does not make a point whether it is one time action(asking action) or a regular action.I feel like depening on how you treat the phrase the whole tense is changed.

    First of all, it does not matter to the understanding of the article whether this action took place only once or over and over again.

    My confusion is basically triggered by the articile.Please see this link.

    Participial Adjectives II

    This issue has nothing to do with participle adjectives. "you are asked" is just the Simple Present tense in passive voice. Please study this chart

    Verb Tense Chart

    For more of a discussion on the creation and use of passive voice I refer you to this link

    Active and Passive Verbs

    Now this is American English but it is the same as British English in this case.

    Suppose if you to convert the following sentence to active voice whats the equivalent one.

    The sentence is :you are asked (by someone) to do a job

    Is the active voice equivalent is "some one asked you to do a job" or "some one asks you to do a job".

    "some one asks you to do a job" is the correct conversion to active voice.
    ............

Similar Threads

  1. Correct mistakes in passage
    By Wai_Wai in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 27-Mar-2008, 08:27
  2. Is this sentence correct?
    By tchandok in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 19-Dec-2007, 16:24
  3. Correct interpretation using adjective clause
    By gorikaz in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 15-Nov-2006, 20:12
  4. Correct / wrong...
    By tangelatm in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 13-Sep-2006, 23:09
  5. Which sentence is correct? (plz help)
    By juliana0403 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-Aug-2006, 22:24

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •