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  1. angliholic's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile It is good of him to apologize.

    It is good of him to apologize.
    It is impossible for him to apologize.


    Do both of the above versions sound fine? If yes, could you come up with a good reason why the first uses of while the second takes for? Thanks.


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    #2

    Re: It is good of him to apologize.

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    It is good of him to apologize.
    It is impossible for him to apologize.


    Do both of the above versions sound fine? If yes, could you come up with a good reason why the first uses of while the second takes for? Thanks.
    The first sentence can use "for" as well but the meanings are different.

    It is good of him to apologize. (People think that he did a good thing.)

    It is good for him to apologize. (It is in his best interest to apologize)

    With respect to the second sentence only "for" seems to work. The use of "of" does not sound correct to me....but I cannot explain why.

    It is impossible for him to apologize.
    (he cannot apologize for some reason)

  2. angliholic's Avatar
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    #3

    Smile Re: It is good of him to apologize.

    Quote Originally Posted by Naamplao View Post
    The first sentence can use "for" as well but the meanings are different.

    It is good of him to apologize. (People think that he did a good thing.)

    It is good for him to apologize. (It is in his best interest to apologize)

    With respect to the second sentence only "for" seems to work. The use of "of" does not sound correct to me....but I cannot explain why.

    It is impossible for him to apologize.
    (he cannot apologize for some reason)
    Thanks, Naamplao.
    Does the first sample also imply that he is so good that he apologizes?

    By the way, I wonder if it is all right to write "It is his best interest to apologize" instead of "It is in his best interest to apologize." If not, what does "in" refer to in the context?


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    #4

    Re: It is good of him to apologize.

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Thanks, Naamplao.
    Does the first sample also imply that he is so good that he apologizes?

    Not really, this is usually spoken by someone behind the apologizer's back. It is not said to that person. Someone is giving approval of that person's action.

    Perhaps that person normally doesn't apologize or wasn't expected to apologize but this time he did.

    By the way, I wonder if it is all right to write "It is his best interest to apologize" instead of "It is in his best interest to apologize." If not, what does "in" refer to in the context?

    "It is in his best interest to apologize."

    This is how it is said .... the other way is never said and sounds awkward to me.

    I think that "in" in this case acts like an adverb.

    I found this in the American Heritage Dictionary in 1. The American HeritageŽ Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.

    ADVERB:1. To or toward the inside: opened the door and stepped in. 2. To or toward a destination or goal: The mob closed in. 3. Sports So as to score, as by crossing home plate in baseball: singled the runner in. 4. Within a place, as of business or residence: The manager is in before anyone else. 5. So as to be available or under one's control: We can proceed when all the evidence is in. 6. So as to include or incorporate: Fold in the egg whites. 7. So as to occupy a position of success or favor: campaigned hard and was voted in. 8. In a particular relationship: got in bad with their supervisor.

    #2 seems to apply here.
    ....

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: It is good of him to apologize.

    Quote Originally Posted by Naamplao View Post
    ...
    With respect to the second sentence only "for" seems to work. The use of "of" does not sound correct to me....but I cannot explain why.

    [/COLOR] It is impossible for him to apologize. [/COLOR] (he cannot apologize for some reason)
    But, as I'm sure Naamplao knows, there are contexts where 'impossible of' is possible: 'It was impossible of him to behave like that.' In that case, 'insufferable' would be better, but I've heard 'impossible'.

    b


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    #6

    Re: It is good of him to apologize.

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    But, as I'm sure Naamplao knows, there are contexts where 'impossible of' is possible: 'It was impossible of him to behave like that.' In that case, 'insufferable' would be better, but I've heard 'impossible'.

    b
    Agreed...it is impossible to think of all possible contexts

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