Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 722
    #1

    Within vs In

    Don't worry, I'll be at your place in an hour
    vs
    Don't worry, I'll be at your place within an hour

    What is the difference in meaning between the two sentence? Or more exactly, what is the different between "in" and "within" in the same context?


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #2

    Re: Within vs In

    Quote Originally Posted by belly_ttt View Post
    Don't worry, I'll be at your place in an hour
    vs
    Don't worry, I'll be at your place within an hour

    What is the difference in meaning between the two sentence? Or more exactly, what is the different between "in" and "within" in the same context?
    Not a great deal, Belly. 'within' might suggest to the waitee that "I" will arrive anytime before the hour, possibly in 15 or 20 minutes and 'in' puts the arrival closer to 60 minutes away.


    But don't quote me on this. :)


    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 722
    #3

    Re: Within vs In

    Okay, as you said, "within" suggests that I will arrive anytime before an hour, so what about in?


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #4

    Re: Within vs In

    Quote Originally Posted by belly_ttt View Post
    Okay, as you said, "within" suggests that I will arrive anytime before an hour, so what about in?
    I covered that, too, Belly.

    " ... and 'in' puts the arrival closer to 60 minutes away."


    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 722
    #5

    Re: Within vs In

    I began to realize the difference.
    If we say:" I'll be at Mike's place within an hour", you mean that 60 minutes at the most will you be at Mike's
    If we say:" I'll be at Mike's place in an hour", only after an hour will we get to Mike's
    Is it right?


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #6

    Re: Within vs In

    Quote Originally Posted by belly_ttt View Post
    I began to realize the difference.
    If we say:" I'll be at Mike's place within an hour", you mean that 60 minutes at the most will you be at Mike's
    If we say:" I'll be at Mike's place in an hour", [only] approximately after an hour will we get to Mike's
    Is it right?
    Roughly, but as I said, don't quote me on it.


    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 722
    #7

    Re: Within vs In

    What do you mean by "quote you on it?
    Moreover, what are the differences between ( or among? need help here) "Before and hour", "Within an hour", "In an hour", " After an hour"?
    Last edited by belly_ttt; 25-Nov-2007 at 07:36.


    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 722
    #8

    Re: Within vs In

    Anyone?

  1. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 2
    #9

    Re: Within vs In

    Quote Originally Posted by belly_ttt View Post
    Don't worry, I'll be at your place in an hour
    vs
    Don't worry, I'll be at your place within an hour

    What is the difference in meaning between the two sentence? Or more exactly, what is the different between "in" and "within" in the same context?
    within an hour is the most correct word

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 4,146
    #10

    Re: Within vs In

    Quote Originally Posted by belly_ttt View Post
    Anyone?
    It might be a good idea to use the words please and thank you sometimes.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •