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  1. angliholic's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile He uses his friendly nature to win over students.

    Ken is a professor at the university. He uses his friendly nature to win against/over students.
    Our team won against/over the guest team at the last game.


    Do both against and over work in the above wording? If not, why not? Thanks.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: He uses his friendly nature to win over students.

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Ken is a professor at the university. He uses his friendly nature to win against/over students.
    Our team won against/over the guest team at the last game.


    Do both against and over work in the above wording? If not, why not? Thanks.
    In the first case (about Ken), "win over" is a phrasal verb; he gets them on his side (as opposed to being hostile, which they were before he "turned on the charm").

    In the second case (the team), both are possible (at least, in Br Eng) but "win against" is much more common.

    As to your last question, I don't think it's really fair - that's just the way collocation works.

    b

  3. angliholic's Avatar
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    #3

    Smile Re: He uses his friendly nature to win over students.

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    In the first case (about Ken), "win over" is a phrasal verb; he gets them on his side (as opposed to being hostile, which they were before he "turned on the charm").

    In the second case (the team), both are possible (at least, in Br Eng) but "win against" is much more common.

    As to your last question, I don't think it's really fair - that's just the way collocation works.

    b
    Thanks, Bob.
    Got it.
    By the way, does "he gets/wins them on his side" amounts to "he wins them over?"

    What do you mean by "he turned on his charm?" Is it "he started to show his charm?"

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: He uses his friendly nature to win over students.

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Thanks, Bob.
    Got it.
    By the way, does "he gets[/wins] them on his side" amounts to "he wins them over?"

    What do you mean by "he turned on his charm?" Is it "he started to show his charm?"
    When someone 'turns on the charm' they (intentionally/knowingly) behave in a charming way - they are witty/pleasant/sensitive/attentive/.... A possessive is possible, but "the charm" is more normal.

    b

  5. angliholic's Avatar
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    #5

    Smile Re: He uses his friendly nature to win over students.

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    When someone 'turns on the charm' they (intentionally/knowingly) behave in a charming way - they are witty/pleasant/sensitive/attentive/.... A possessive is possible, but "the charm" is more normal.

    b
    Thanks, Bob.
    Now I get it! But here comes a new challenge! Why did you write the last sentence? What do you mean by "A possessive is possible?"

  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: He uses his friendly nature to win over students.

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Thanks, Bob.
    Now I get it! But here comes a new challenge! Why did you write the last sentence? What do you mean by "A possessive is possible?"
    A possessive pronoun - as in your sentence ("his charm")

    b

  7. angliholic's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: He uses his friendly nature to win over students.

    Thanks, Bob.

    Roger!

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