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  1. angliholic's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile She is no more angry than you are.

    She is no more angry than you are.
    Neither she nor you are angry.
    She is no less angry than you are.
    She is as angry as you are.


    Which ones of the above four are identical and which ones are not to you? Thanks.


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    #2

    Re: She is no more angry than you are.

    I'm not happy to say 'identical' but the following 2 have about the same meaning

    She is no less angry than you are.
    She is as angry as you are.

    I can't bring myself to say that the first two have the same meaning since I cannot imagine saying the second in the the same situation as I would the first. Having said that they both mean that neither is angry.

  2. angliholic's Avatar
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    #3

    Smile Re: She is no more angry than you are.

    Quote Originally Posted by Horsa View Post
    I'm not happy to say 'identical' but the following 2 have about the same meaning

    She is no less angry than you are.
    She is as angry as you are.

    I can't bring myself to say that the first two have the same meaning since I cannot imagine saying the second in the the same situation as I would the first. Having said that they both mean that neither is angry. Would you give examples when to one instead of the other?
    Thanks, Horsa.

    What do you mean by "I can't bring myself to say?"


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    #4

    Re: She is no more angry than you are.

    By 'I'm not happy to say ...' I mean that although technically they convey similar communicative value I don't feel the two sentences can be called identical.

    Would you give examples when to one instead of the other?
    1. She is no more angry than you are.
    2. Neither she nor you are angry.

    In honesty, I would probably never say the second at all. The first I would most likely use to correct the listener's mistaken belief that 'she' is angry with him/her.

  3. angliholic's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: She is no more angry than you are.

    Thanks, Horsa.
    Got it.


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    #6

    Re: She is no more angry than you are.

    Sorry, I answered a question you didn't ask

    By "I can't bring myself to say?" has a similar meaning to "I'm not happy to say."

  4. angliholic's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: She is no more angry than you are.

    Thanks, Horsa.

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