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  1. angliholic's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile She was clearly in distress/depress.

    She was clearly in distress/depress. She could not say a word; she could only cry.


    Are "in distress" and "in depress" all but identical in the above sampe? Thanks.


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    #2

    Re: She was clearly in distress/depress.

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    She was clearly in distress/depress. She could not say a word; she could only cry.


    Are "in distress" and "in depress" all but identical in the above sampe? Thanks.
    You should be able to use a dictionary and find out that these words are not remotely the same. Depress is a verb and distress is a noun. "In depress" is an incorrect construction.

  2. angliholic's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: She was clearly in distress/depress.

    Quote Originally Posted by Naamplao View Post
    You should be able to use a dictionary and find out that these words are not remotely the same. Depress is a verb and distress is a noun. "In depress" is an incorrect construction.
    Thanks, Naamplao.

    And sorry for the mistake! I mean "She was clearly depressed." Does this mean the same as "She was clearly in distress?"


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    #4

    Re: She was clearly in distress/depress.

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Thanks, Naamplao.

    And sorry for the mistake! I mean "She was clearly depressed." Does this mean the same as "She was clearly in distress?"
    Again, you sould use a dictionary/thesaurus to try to solve this.


    depress
    verb
    1. To make sad or gloomy: deject, dispirit, oppress, sadden, weigh down.
    2. To cause to descend: drop, let down, lower 2, take down.
    3. To become or make less in price or value: cheapen, depreciate, devaluate, devalue, downgrade, lower 2, mark down, reduce, write down.

    distress
    noun

    1. A troubled or anxious state of mind: angst, anxiety, anxiousness, care, concern, disquiet, disquietude, nervousness, solicitude, unease, uneasiness, worry.
    2. A state of physical or mental suffering: affliction, agony, anguish, hurt, misery, pain, torment, torture, woe, wound, wretchedness.
    3. The condition of being in need of immediate assistance: exigence, exigency, hot water, trouble.


    Do they share the same meaning/synonyms???? Not really.

    #1 for Depress(v) and #1 for Distress(n) are vaguely the same but it would take a special context to even make this a possibility.

  3. angliholic's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: She was clearly in distress/depress.

    Naaplao, thanks.

    It's not that I'm too lazy to check a dictionary but that I have checked both of them for too many times. And they were still confusing until discussing them with you.
    We non-nativers used to learn English by reading and consulting dictionaries, and I thinkthey are boring and futile. Besides, I don't want you to consult a dictionary for me; I just want your English instinct.

    Best regards,


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    #6

    Re: She was clearly in distress/depress.

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Naaplao, thanks.

    It's not that I'm too lazy to check a dictionary but that I have checked both of them for too many times. And they were still confusing until discussing them with you.
    We non-nativers used to learn English by reading and consulting dictionaries, and I thinkthey are boring and futile. Besides, I don't want you to consult a dictionary for me; I just want your English instinct.

    Best regards,
    Well, sometimes you ask for comparisons that are obvious when looking at a dictionary/thesaurus. I can understand wanting clarification when two choices seem to be the same on the surface, but not when they are as different as are these in this question.

    Asking for my "English instinct" is flattering but less than instructive. In order to support my position I should (and usually do) offer support from dictionary/thesaurus sources. These are not boring/futile sources. These are the tools necessary to learn a language properly.

    You are at a level where you should be able to use these information sources properly. I submit you are being a bit lazy by asking questions that can be easily resolved by consulting a dictionary/thesaurus.

    Consulting a dictionary/thesaurus makes you go through the reasoning process that native English speakers go through when they want to be sure of an answer. Being spoon-fed answers on simple (for your level) questions is not a way for you to progress in your language development.

  4. angliholic's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: She was clearly in distress/depress.

    Thanks, Naamplao.
    Roger!

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    #8

    Re: She was clearly in distress/depress.

    The other word you need to know about is 'depression', a noun.
    She was clearly in distress.
    She was clearly in (a state of) depression.
    The two "d" words do not have the same meaning but they both are bad. Depression can cause distress but many other things can cause distress.

  5. angliholic's Avatar
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    #9

    Smile Re: She was clearly in distress/depress.

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    The other word you need to know about is 'depression', a noun.
    She was clearly in distress.
    She was clearly in (a state of) depression.
    The two "d" words do not have the same meaning but they both are bad. Depression can cause distress but many other things can cause distress.
    Thanks, 2006, for the helpful info.

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