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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    fair enough

    Hi there,

    What does it mean by 'fair enough!'?
    Under what situation we will use 'fair enough!'?
    thanks
    pete

  2. LwyrFirat's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
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    #2

    Re: fair enough

    One of my lecturers used to use this phrase very often.

    As far as I noticed depending on your voice tone it can be either a question or the illustration of your understanding.

    For ex: When the lecturer is teaching the class he is giving an example about the topic and just after giving the example he is asking to class that "fair enough ?" by meaning, "did you understand why I gave this example", "did you understand the connection of this example with the topic?"

    If as a student you say yes it's "fair enough", you mean that yes I understood why you gave this example.

    Briefly as far as I know the phrase "fair enough" means " yes I quite understood why you did that, why you said that etc."

    I am neither a native nor a teacher if I am wrong please correct me
    Last edited by LwyrFirat; 08-Dec-2007 at 16:18.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #3

    Re: fair enough

    LwyrFirat - was/is your teacher Australian?
    'fair enough' is very common in Australia. It is used when there is a mild disagreement, a difference of opinion, or someone's actions have been questioned and the person gives his reasons which then sound acceptable.
    A person could also use it in this way:
    "He should have known better than drive off into the bush without stocking up on petrol and water. Fair enough, he's only been here a few months, but any drongo (idiot/half-wit) knows that."
    That is, the person is trying to be fair and see reasons for why something may have happened, but still disagrees/ has a negative opinion.
    It can be used to calm down a situation when there is more than a mild disagreement, as in 'fair enough mate', meaning that you accept the reasons why he is so angry, that he has a legitimate right to be angry, and want the matter to stop there, not go any further, and won't challenge him/disagree with him any further on the matter.
    In a more general way, it is used to indicate that something is acceptable, something has been explained that satisfies the person asking. In LwyrFirat's example with his teacher, it is not so much, do you understand, as, will you accept that, does that explain it sufficiently so that you understand? The student's response of 'fair enough' means, yes, I'll accept that, that explains it. (Understand that in Australia, students are more challenging of teachers to explain when things aren't clear or when the student actually disagrees with the teacher's opinion on some matter, whereas in Asian countries, this apparently would be seen as grossly impolite.)
    Last edited by David L.; 08-Dec-2007 at 09:14.

  3. LwyrFirat's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
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    #4

    Re: fair enough

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    LwyrFirat - was/is your teacher Australian?
    .)
    He was very typical middle aged British man. I really don't exaggerate after every 5-6 sentence he used to say "fair enough" :). So was my explanation about the phrase wrong? If so, I am really sorry about that.
    Last edited by LwyrFirat; 08-Dec-2007 at 16:18.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #5

    Re: fair enough

    Hang on, hang on LwyrFirat. I wasn't at all saying you were wrong. On the contrary, I thought you had made a damn good job of 'divining' what it must mean from the context in the classroom! It's just, growing up in Australia for 40 years, I had more opportunity to learn the nuances of meaning of this expression.
    So, he's very British. Well, the expression travels well! Perhaps he's watched a lot of Australian soap operas.

  4. LwyrFirat's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 343
    #6

    Re: fair enough

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    Hang on, hang on LwyrFirat. I wasn't at all saying you were wrong. On the contrary, I thought you had made a damn good job of 'divining' what it must mean from the context in the classroom! It's just, growing up in Australia for 40 years, I had more opportunity to learn the nuances of meaning of this expression.
    So, he's very British. Well, the expression travels well! Perhaps he's watched a lot of Australian soap operas.
    Alright then ;) Thank you very much for the compliment.

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