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    #1

    Rainwash

    Hi all,

    I know what «rainwash» means but, Could the term be used as figurative languaje?
    I.e. Christmas: saying you are making a rainwashed sortie across the gift shops meaning you are buying everything you find in your way... Like a hurricane or a tidal wave?

    Thanks


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    #2

    Re: Rainwash

    Quote Originally Posted by jiho View Post
    Hi all,

    I know what «rainwash» means but, Could the term be used as figurative language?
    I.e. Christmas: saying you are making a rainwashed sortie across the gift shops meaning you are buying everything you find in your way... Like a hurricane or a tidal wave?

    Thanks
    I've never heard it used that way, Jiho, in fact, I'm not all that familiar with the term 'rainwash' as I grew up in an area where not much rain falls. But that's exactly how we make use of figurative language.

  1. Amigos4's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Rainwash

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    I've never heard it used that way, Jiho, in fact, I'm not all that familiar with the term 'rainwash' as I grew up in an area where not much rain falls. But that's exactly how we make use of figurative language.
    Jiho,

    I agree with riverkid. 'Rainwashed sortie' is definitely not commonly used in North America. It has a European flair to it.

    In the US we will 'go on a buying spree' or make a 'mad dash' when we do lots of shopping.

    Cheers,
    Amigos4


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    #4

    Re: Rainwash

    Quote Originally Posted by jiho View Post
    Hi all,

    I know what «rainwash» means but, Could the term be used as figurative languaje?
    I.e. Christmas: saying you are making a rainwashed sortie across the gift shops meaning you are buying everything you find in your way... Like a hurricane or a tidal wave?

    Thanks
    Sounds as if you got very wet.

    We made a mad dash through the shops, snapping things up left and right.

    We surged through the shops, sweeping up everything we could find.

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    #5

    Re: Rainwash

    OK I get the point about the shopping issue both in the US and Europe, but
    Is there any context in which «rainwashed» could be used as figurative languaje?

    I was just discarding any other possible meaning different from the usual.

    Thank you so much to all of you Riverkid, Amigos4, and Anglika


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    #6

    Re: Rainwash

    Here's a try:

    If you hyphenated it - rain-washed - you could extrapolate from the use of the phrase to describe debris washed down a mountain.

    The appalling disasters in the mortgage field were rain-washed because of the banks' failure to recognise the impending situation.

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    #7

    Re: Rainwash

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Here's a try:

    If you hyphenated it - rain-washed - you could extrapolate from the use of the phrase to describe debris washed down a mountain.

    The appalling disasters in the mortgage field were rain-washed because of the banks' failure to recognise the impending situation.
    Pretty clear
    Thank You


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    #8

    Re: Rainwash

    Quote Originally Posted by jiho View Post
    OK I get the point about the shopping issue both in the US and Europe, but
    Is there any context in which «rainwashed» could be used as figurative language?

    I was just discarding any other possible meaning different from the usual.
    The others were pointing out that they too, had never heard any such references, Jiho, but my point is that you could certainly "invent" one. That's how idioms are made and there's no reason whatsoever that a second language learner cannot/could not create one.

    I think that it's very creative, very apt when I apply it to certain folks I know who shop like a tidal wave.

    She's on another rainwash sortie.

    It's good!

  2. Amigos4's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Rainwash

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    The others were pointing out that they too, had never heard any such references, Jiho, but my point is that you could certainly "invent" one. That's how idioms are made and there's no reason whatsoever that a second language learner cannot/could not create one.

    I think that it's very creative, very apt when I apply it to certain folks I know who shop like a tidal wave.

    She's on another rainwash sortie.

    It's good!
    I don't care for 'rain-washed'... it leaves me disinterested in the lady's shopping escapade. It sounds more like she's washing her hair during a rain shower.

    How about: "My wife is a tireless tsunami when she endeavors to complete her last minute Christmas shopping!"

    Cheers,
    Amigos4

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    #10

    Re: Rainwash

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    The others were pointing out that they too, had never heard any such references, Jiho, but my point is that you could certainly "invent" one. That's how idioms are made and there's no reason whatsoever that a second language learner cannot/could not create one.

    I think that it's very creative, very apt when I apply it to certain folks I know who shop like a tidal wave.

    She's on another rainwash sortie.

    It's good!
    Thanks for the encouragement, Kid!

    That point of yours about the ease and flexibility of English languaje creating new terms is one of the things I envy the most and also miss in Spanish, we have an "official languaje body" (RAE) to decide which term is officially accepted and which is not, and it makes the whole thing so stiff sometimes. Others is better as you have an always valid reference to write the right stuff.

    Thank You so much again!

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