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  1. angliholic's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile oppose each other

    In one Celtic myth, the oak king and the holly king oppose each other in their desire to rule the forest.


    Is it apt to interpret "oppose each other" as "are against each other/are rivals/oppose to each other?" Thanks.

  2. Amigos4's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: oppose each other

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    In one Celtic myth, the oak king and the holly king oppose each other in their desire to rule the forest.


    Is it apt to interpret "oppose each other" as "are against each other/are rivals/oppose to each other?" Thanks.
    Angli,

    Yes, the oak king and the holly king are rivals. They both want to rule the forest.

    Cheers,
    Amigos4

  3. angliholic's Avatar
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    #3

    Smile Re: oppose each other

    Quote Originally Posted by amigos4 View Post
    Angli,

    Yes, the oak king and the holly king are rivals. They both want to rule the forest.

    Cheers,
    Amigos4
    Thanks, Amigos4.

    To make sure, do my other versions sound right, especially "oppose to each other?" When should I use "oppose+somebody" and when "oppose to + somebody?"


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    #4

    Re: oppose each other

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Thanks, Amigos4.

    To make sure, do my other versions sound right, especially "oppose to each other?" When should I use "oppose+somebody" and when "oppose to + somebody?"
    You oppose somebody and are opposed to something. You are not generally opposed to somebody. You can be opposed to somebody being/doing something.

    Of your alternatives I only like "are rivals".

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    #5

    Re: oppose each other

    You can’t have the ‘to’ in ‘oppose (*to) each other’. It’s a transitive verb when used with the meaning you indicated. ‘Each other’ is the object of the verb ‘oppose’. You don’t insert a preposition between them. You may say the oak king opposes the holly king or vice versa; you can’t say the oak king opposes (*to) the holly king. You generally can have the structure "oppose + somebody or something" but not "oppose to + somebody”. You may say I oppose your resolution. If you turn ‘oppose’ into its noun ‘opposition’, you may say The oak king is in opposition to the holly king in the control of the forest.

  4. angliholic's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: oppose each other

    Thanks, Anglika and Buddhaheart.

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