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  1. angliholic's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile She kept up a steady diet of all fruits and vegetables.

    She kept up a steady diet of all fruits and vegetables. She never ate any kind f meat.


    Does the bolded line sound right? If yes, is it the same as "She went on a diet of all fruits and vegetables?" Thanks.

  2. #2

    Re: She kept up a steady diet of all fruits and vegetables.

    The problem it is that diet has two meanings in English, and you can't always be sure, even in context, which meaning is intended.

    Diet can mean simply "what a person eats."
    But to be on a diet means to try to lose weight by eating less, or by eating food that is less fattening.

    I'd consider avoiding the word diet.
    She ate nothing but fruit and vegetables.

    The doctor told him he must lose weight, so he went on a diet of fruit and vegetables.
    I was trying to keep to [follow, stick to] my diet, but I couldn't resist the temptation. I ate the whole pizza.
    She's crabby today. She's on a diet and she's always hungry.

    cheers!
    edward

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    She kept up a steady diet of all fruits and vegetables. She never ate any kind f meat.


    Does the bolded line sound right? If yes, is it the same as "She went on a diet of all fruits and vegetables?" Thanks.

  3. angliholic's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: She kept up a steady diet of all fruits and vegetables.

    Thanks, Edward.
    Got it.

    To make sure, does the first sample in my first post sound right at all?

  4. #4

    Re: She kept up a steady diet of all fruits and vegetables.

    Yeah, but I like "kept to" better than "kept up."
    edward

  5. angliholic's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: She kept up a steady diet of all fruits and vegetables.

    Quote Originally Posted by baqarah131 View Post
    Yeah, but I like "kept to" better than "kept up."
    edward
    Thanks, Edward.
    Are there any differences between "kept to and kept up a steady diet of ...?"

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    #6

    Re: She kept up a steady diet of all fruits and vegetables.

    Dear Angliholic,

    Please, see the following brief excerpt from a Dictionary:

    keep to = to adhere to, conform to "She keep to the rules."

    to confine oneself "to keep to one's bed"

    keep up = to maintain an equal rate of speed, activity, or progress with another or others
    to persevere, continue
    to maintain the good condition of, keep in repair

    "to keep up one's spirit"
    "you're doing well, keep it up"

    Regards.

    V.

  6. angliholic's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: She kept up a steady diet of all fruits and vegetables.

    Thanks, Vil.
    Roger!

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    #8

    Re: She kept up a steady diet of all fruits and vegetables.

    Roger Wilco, Angliholic.

    V.

  7. angliholic's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: She kept up a steady diet of all fruits and vegetables.

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Roger Wilco, Angliholic.

    V.
    Thanks, Vil.

    For curiosity sake, where did you run into "Roger Wilco?" I've never seen "Wilco" being used anywhere in my life.

  8. Amigos4's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: She kept up a steady diet of all fruits and vegetables.

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Thanks, Vil.

    For curiosity sake, where did you run into "Roger Wilco?" I've never seen "Wilco" being used anywhere in my life.
    Angli,

    "Roger Wilco" is a combination of terms used primarily by aviators and members of the military. "Roger" means 'information received'. "Wilco" means 'will comply'.

    For example, a flight controller might radio the pilot of an incoming flight and say: 'Flight #197, land on runway 24 east." The pilot would respond, 'Roger' (I received the instruction) Wilco (I will comply by landing on runway 24 east.) In other words, the pilot is using verbal shorthand!

    When vil responded by saying "Roger Wilco, Angliholic" he was letting you know that he received your thank-you and he was appreciative of your courtesy.

    Cheers,
    Amigos4

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