Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. Unregistered
    Guest
    #1

    Some little questions

    Hi, since english it's not my first language, I have some questions about your language and I'd really appreciate if you can help me.

    My first question is:

    When you use this expression: I'd love to meet you, it means I would love to meet you, but, I've seen that sometimes this: "I'd" it's used to talk about past, like if "I'd" meant "I did". Is that possible? Or am I just wrong?. And if it's possible, How can I realize that it's been using meaning past, or something conditional?

    Second, the expression "I've got ..." means literally what it's written, or it's some kind of modism for you?. I mean, for example: I've got nothing to hide from you, it means, that all this time I haven't got nothing to hide from you?. Or you could use it like a modism in different phrases?.

    And finally, the word "Haunt" and its derivatives, What does it mean?.

    For example, I've seen it in some lyrics, like:

    1.- Now it's time for you to move on
    Leave the shadows of your past
    Don't let them haunt you forever

    2.- Song: The Haunting

    Somewhere in time
    I will find you and haunt you again
    Like the wind sweeps the earth

    So, in the first case, Haunt it means like some ghost chasing?, somekind of harassing?. And what about in the second case?

    And what it means, The haunted, The haunting, etc.

    I'm sorry about all the mistakes in my english, but like I said, it's not my first language.

    And beforehand, I thank you for all your replys.


    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 1,153
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: Some little questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    Hi, since english it's not my first language, I have some questions about your language and I'd really appreciate if you can help me.

    My first question is:

    When you use this expression: I'd love to meet you, it means I would love to meet you, but, I've seen that sometimes this: "I'd" it's used to talk about past, like if "I'd" meant "I did". Is that possible? Or am I just wrong?. And if it's possible, How can I realize that it's been using meaning past, or something conditional?

    Second, the expression "I've got ..." means literally what it's written, or it's some kind of modism for you?. I mean, for example: I've got nothing to hide from you, it means, that all this time I haven't got nothing to hide from you?. Or you could use it like a modism in different phrases?.

    As with a lot of things with English, the context in which the words are used determine what they actually mean.

    And finally, the word "Haunt" and its derivatives, What does it mean?.

    Haunt (v) means (as per The Oxford Dictionary of Current English)

    1. (of a ghost) visit (a place) regularly.
    2. frequent (a place)
    3. linger in the mind of.

    This definition aside, haunt and haunting has the feeling of being uncomfortable. It might linger in your mind but often it is a disturbing thought... or in poetry if you are in love, for example, the thought of a lover (her beauty or the fact that he/she doesn't return your love) occupies your every thought.

    For example, I've seen it in some lyrics, like:

    1.- Now it's time for you to move on
    Leave the shadows of your past
    Don't let them haunt you forever

    Means: don't let problems in the past bother you forever

    2.- Song: The Haunting

    Somewhere in time
    I will find you and haunt you again
    Like the wind sweeps the earth

    Without more context (that is not knowing whether the person saying this is dead or alive or talking about what they will do if alive or dead) it basically means that you cannot escape this person. Wherever you go eventually he/she will find you and they will be in your life again...probably unwanted.

    So, in the first case, Haunt it means like some ghost chasing?, somekind of harassing?. And what about in the second case?

    Actually you are correct about haunting meaning harassment but it is the second case, not the first case, that this applies to.

    And what it means, The haunted, The haunting, etc.

    "the haunted" can mean those people who are haunted by something.
    Something like this:


    I pity drug addicts, the haunted, who use a needle to escape their demons.

    "the haunting" can refer to the event.

    The haunting of ghosts is mocked by those people who don't believe in them.

    Haunting and haunted can also be adjectives which describe the worried look of a person or an eerie sensation.

    The haunted look in her eyes gave truth to the rumour that she was a troubled person.

    The haunting moan at night sent shivers down my spine.


    I'm sorry about all the mistakes in my english, but like I said, it's not my first language.

    You explained yourself well....I hope I did the same for you.

    And beforehand, I thank you for all your replys.
    ........


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: Some little questions

    When you use this expression: I'd love to meet you, it means I would love to meet you, but, I've seen that sometimes this: "I'd" it's used to talk about past, like if "I'd" meant "I did". Is that possible? Or am I just wrong?. And if it's possible, How can I realize that it's been using meaning past, or something conditional?

    I'd is a contraction of
    ē I would or I should : I'd like a bath.
    ē I had : I'd agreed to go.
    Note the verb that follows 'I'd' - in the first sentence, the verb is in the present tense, in the second, past tense. We can't say, 'I had like a bath' nor 'I would agreed to go', so the verb indicates which one it is. (We would have to say, "I would have agreed to go if..."/"I'd have agreed to go if...")


    Second, the expression "I've got ..." means literally what it's written, or it's some kind of modism for you?. I mean, for example: I've got nothing to hide from you, it means, that all this time I haven't got nothing to hide from you?. Or you could use it like a modism in different phrases?.

    I've got/I have nothing to hide from you. ( This indicates that the person has nothing in their past life that they do not wish to reveal/disclose/divulge, for whatever reason.)
    I've got a great big bruise on my leg. ( right here and now, take a look)
    I've got an exam today/tomorrow/next week.

Similar Threads

  1. Passive
    By cheap cigarette in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 21-May-2007, 21:29
  2. Please, please answer the questions!
    By asad hussain in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 14-Jan-2007, 13:53
  3. Please answer the questions!
    By asad hussain in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Jan-2007, 01:51
  4. Many questions.....
    By sula54 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-Nov-2005, 12:18
  5. Proofread plus long list of questions
    By HaraKiriBlade in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 27-Jun-2005, 15:46

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •