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    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 6
    #1

    The right word ?

    What is the best word that I can use ?

    So what have the management gurus produced in the way of new techniques for motivation?
    The answer, it seems, is not a lot. Ideas about motivation get repackaged and renamed but fundamentally or primarily ( I think it is fundamentally ) remain the same as ever. The fact that they know some of the key factors in motivation has not prevented many managers from overseeing / ignoring or slipping them. This is because few managers are trained in the aptitude or art or mastery and have themselves never been well managed, and so one gets the perpetuation or perseverance ( also thought about the word endurance ) ofincompetence. That explains why people seem to have heard about, but not seen, successful motivational management in practice.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #2

    Re: The right word ?

    So what have the management gurus produced in the way of new techniques for motivation?
    The answer, it seems, is not a lot. Ideas about motivation get repackaged and renamed but fundamentally remain the same as ever. The fact that they know some of the key factors in motivation has not prevented many managers from ignoring them.

    This is because few managers are trained in the aptitude or art or mastery
    of what? - of putting motivational factors into practice in the workplace, or in the skill of management itself? Does "are trained in " refer back to 'key factors in motivation' or being trained in management skills? It sounds more like the latter, because the paragraph continues:

    and have themselves never been well managed,

    ...which suggests, they have not been trained to be good managers, nor have they learned from the experience of having had good managers in their earlier working life.

    This is because few managers have either been trained in that very skill, or have experiences of having been well managed themselves,

    This sentence remains very very clumsy and requires a major redrafting!!


    and so one gets the perpetuation or perseverance ( also thought about the word endurance ) ofincompetence.

    and so incompetence is perpetuated.

    That explains
    You've used a singular subject, yet you've actually given three factors - lack of training, paucity of good role models, and perpetuation of incompetence.

    It is for these reasons that people seem to have heard about,
    Heard from where? Since so few managers practice it both now and in the past, have they 'heard' about it in books? but not seen, successful motivational management in practice.
    Last edited by David L.; 17-Dec-2007 at 02:14.

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