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    • Join Date: Dec 2007
    • Posts: 16
    #1

    double-verbs

    he started screaming . . .
    he started talking about . . .

    so after 1st verb we should put -ing on the 2nd verb ?

    can we just use "to" before the 2nd verb ?
    ex : he started to scream . . . / he started to talk about . . .

    thx before


    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 65
    #2

    Re: double-verbs

    You can use to after another verb with similar meaning to start: begin

    he began to scream
    he began to talk about


    • Join Date: Dec 2007
    • Posts: 16
    #3

    Re: double-verbs

    i mean, are these sentence the same ?

    he began to scream = he began screaming <-- are these the same ?

    he began to talk about = he began talking about<-- are these the same ?

    thx


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #4

    Re: double-verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by kutu_suci View Post
    i mean, are these sentence the same ?

    he began to scream = he began screaming <-- are these the same ?

    he began to talk about = he began talking about<-- are these the same ?

    thx
    Yes, in these verb situations they are the same. In some verb situations they are NOT the same. How can you tell when they are different or they are the same? I don't have the foggiest notion when, Kutu_Suci!

    There must be something more than learned idiom that twigs a native speaker's brain to a difference in meaning but again, I don't know what it is.

    For an ESL, all I can offer now is that you learn, actively, that for certain verbs, there is a difference in meaning. Practice these in as as rich a context as you can create, as often as you can until they are internalized, that is, they become as natural as breathing.

    Don't just leave these as "paper language", Kutu_Suci.. You'll be surprised at how much you can teach yourself by actually creating real life language situations, sometimes with the help of a teacher, sometimes by yourself, and then practicing these by actually verbalizing them, even if it's in isolation, that is, by yourself.


    • Join Date: Dec 2007
    • Posts: 16
    #5

    Re: double-verbs

    uhm yup riverkid, im still beginner now but im trying to learn english as much as i can . . .

    "that for certain verbs, there is a difference in meaning. Practice these in as as rich a context as you can create . . . Don't just leave these as "paper language", Kutu_Suci.. "

    can i know what do u mean by that ?

    thx before and thx for your encouragement, i really appreciate that


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #6

    Re: double-verbs

    Quote Originally Posted by kutu_suci View Post
    uhm yup riverkid, im still beginner now but im trying to learn english as much as i can . . .

    "that for certain verbs, there is a difference in meaning. Practice these in as as rich a context as you can create . . . Don't just leave these as "paper language", Kutu_Suci.. "

    can i [know] find out what [do] u mean by that ?

    thx before and thx for your encouragement, i really appreciate that
    You obviously have some book that tells you which verbs taking 'to' and which take 'ing' and which take both. Practice the model sentences that are likely given in the book. Then try to make up your own sentences.Use things for your actual life. That will make the language more meaningful.

    Example - 'stop' uses both

    [walking in your house; drop a lot of items on the floor]

    I stopped to drop a pen.

    I stopped to drop a book.

    I stopped to drop ...

    I stopped ...

    Then reverse the process.

    I stopped to pick up the pen.

    [walk a bit further]

    I stopped to pick up the {___}.

    Next, the 'ing' form.

    Read and stop --> I stopped reading

    Drink and stop --> I stopped drinking

    ...

    You can teach yourself a lot of English. It's especially important that the examples of a real context. That exactly how you learned your first language, Kutu_Suci.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Greek
      • Home Country:
      • Greece
      • Current Location:
      • Greece

    • Join Date: Dec 2007
    • Posts: 84
    #7

    Re: double-verbs

    Start and begin are two of those verbs which can be followed by either the infinitive or a gerund usually with little or no change in meaning. There are a few cases, however, when you must use only one of the two. Although I don't know any particular rules, from experience I can say that sometimes only the infinitive should be used. In my opinion, in the following examples only an infinitive can be used:

    -He began to see the truth.
    -They began to understand what was going on.

    It seems to me that verbs of perception should be put in the infinitive after such verbs, not in the gerund form.

    Also:
    -We arrived just as they were starting to play (starting playing would sound rather chaotic).

    As for stop, using it with both gerund and infinitive in the same sentence can perhaps show the difference quite clearly:

    -I stopped singing to listen to the rain (what did you stop? --> gerund - why [ie for what purpose] did you stop what you were doing? --> infinitive).

    Anyway, Riverkid's advice is excellent and I think you'd profit a lot by following it

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