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    #1

    4 more questions

    1) What are the differences betweeen these words?
    Say vs speak vs talk
    Hear vs Listen
    Look vs See
    2) Has anybody taken the CPE test? What is the format of its? I've seen lots of sources which tells the different formats. One example taken from CPE practice tests- Mark Harrison-for new tests for the revised Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English, the Reading part consists of 4 parts lasting for 1hour 30 minutes whilst in other sources, they said Reading parts lasts for 1 hour only. Has the format changed? ( Am I right to use changed here or been changed?)
    3) What do they mean by saying: For the average student the semester in front of the camera is thus a slow peeling away of layers of perfomance inhibitions. What is peeling away?
    4) Why do people say" Or so you'd think"?
    Editted:
    5)
    5) When I went into the dining room next morning, the_________ of the dinner were still on the table
    a) remains
    b) remnants
    The answer is a. Why is b not suitable here?
    Last edited by belly_ttt; 22-Dec-2007 at 10:08.

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    #2

    Re: 4 more questions

    A: When I speak you'd better listen. Do you hear me?

    B: I am looking, but I can't see.
    More later.



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    #3

    Re: 4 more questions

    I'll try a couple.

    3) What do they mean by saying: For the average student the semester in front of the camera is thus a slow peeling away of layers of performance inhibitions. What is peeling away?

    Imagine peeling away layers of an onion. Now think of each of these layers as an inhibition/fear/reluctance that people have about appearing in front of a camera. That's what it means?

    4) Why do people say" Or so you'd think"?

    It's said kind of like a tag question, seeking agreement from listeners, or softening their previous statement.

    Here's an example;



    "The USA never shows any remorse for the disproportionate number of people killed in their little invasions. They just keep repeating the same old lies, that they're bringing democracy.

    How are the, conservatively speaking, 80,000 some people who now lie dead because of this illegal and immoral invasion supposed to enjoy democracy? The lies are so transparent. Anyone with half a brain wouldn't fall for this type of propaganda. Or so you'd think."
    Last edited by riverkid; 23-Dec-2007 at 03:52.

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    #4

    Re: 4 more questions

    To discuss say, speak, and talk, go here: https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...tml#post239095


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    #5

    Re: 4 more questions

    For the difference between listen and hear, go to: https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...tml#post239129


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    #6

    Re: 4 more questions

    Quote Originally Posted by belly_ttt View Post
    Look vs See
    To look at something tends to require more active participation on the part of the doer than to see something does. We have to make a conscious effort to look at something, while we do not necessarily have to make any kind of effort at all to see something.

    ~R

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    #7

    Re: 4 more questions

    Quote Originally Posted by belly_ttt View Post
    What is the format of its?
    What is its format?

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    #8

    adding to what others have said...

    Basically look and listen are 'action' words, something you do. See and hear are 'result' words, the result of your action.
    Of course you can look/listen and still not see/hear what you are looking/listening for. On the other hand, you can see/hear without any effort on your part, if there is something you can't avoid seeing or hearing.

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    #9

    something about "say", "speak", "talk" and "tell"

    These words of oral amd written English are all verbs; talk and say are also nouns. The verbs mainly differ in their grammar.
    Talk and speak are very similar; speak is more formal and less commonly used.
    I want to (talk)(speak) to/with you after work today.
    When my father was unhappy with me, he always (talked)(spoke) to me very formally.
    What did the guests talk about? (here speak is too formal)
    How long did the president (talk)(speak)?
    Don't (talk)(speak) for more than 20 minutes.

    Talk and speak are often followed by words like to, with, about and for. We also say things like '(talk)( speak) slowly and clearly.'
    You can say 'speak English'. We don't say 'talk English' unless one means talk about English.

    You can not say '(Say)(Tell) English', but you can say 'Say (it)(something) in English.' and 'Tell me something in English.'

    Say is very commonly used.
    What did he say? I didn't understand what he said. Say that again. Say it more slowly. I almost always agree with what he says. The weather man says it will be much colder tomorrow.

    Say and tell are more commonly used for written things than talk and speak are. What did John say in his letter? The second chapter of the book will tell us about Napoleon's childhood.

    Tell is almost aways immediately followed by a noun or pronoun that serves as a direct or indirect object.
    Tell us more about yourself.
    Tell (me)(Kate)(the class) what you did on Christmas Day.
    I told the police what I saw.
    I told my story to anyone who would listen.

    When you (speak)(talk) to the students, what will you (say)(say to them)(tell them)?
    Last edited by 2006; 18-May-2009 at 15:58. Reason: some minor improvements

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    #10

    Re: something about "say", "speak", "talk" and "tell"

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    These words of oral and written English are all verbs; talk is also a noun. The verbs mainly differ in their grammar.
    talk and speak are very similar; speak is more formal and less commonly used.
    I want to (talk)(speak) to/with you after work today.
    When my father was unhappy with me, he always (talked)(spoke) to me very formally.
    What did the guests talk about? (here speak is too formal)
    How long did the president (talk)(speak)?
    Don't (talk)(speak) for more than 20 minutes.

    Talk and speak are often followed by words like to, with, about and for. We also say things like '(talk)( speak) slowly and clearly.'
    You can say 'Speak English'. We don't normally say 'Talk English' unless one means talk about English.

    You can not say '(Say)(Tell) English', but you can say 'Say (it)(something) in English.' and 'Tell me something in English.'

    Say is very commonly used.
    What did he say? I didn't understand what he said. Say that again. Say it more slowly. I almost always agree with what he says. The weather man says it will be much colder tomorrow.

    Say and tell are more commonly used for written things than talk and speak are. What did John say in his letter? The second chapter of the book will tell us about Napoleon's childhood.

    Tell is almost aways immediately followed by a noun or pronoun that serves as a direct or indirect object.
    Tell us more about yourself.
    Tell (me)(Kate)(the class) what you did on Christmas Day.
    I told the police what I saw.
    I told my story to anyone who would listen.

    When you (speak)(talk) to the students, what will you (say)(say to them)(tell them)?
    Excellent!
    Last edited by RonBee; 24-Dec-2007 at 11:33. Reason: spelling

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