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  1. angliholic's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile I felt sympathetic toward/for/with the kids there.

    I felt sympathetic toward/for/with the kids there (an orphanage).



    Do all of the bolded words fit in the above? Are there subtle differences in meaning among them? Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: I felt sympathetic toward/for/with the kids there.

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    I felt sympathetic toward/for/with the kids there (an orphanage).
    I would only say, I feel sympathetic toward the kids there.

    One can aso say, I feel sympathy for the kids there.

    One can also say "...in sympathy with....", but one is usually in sympathy with someone else's efforts or objectives, rather than being in sympathy with 'them'.



    Do all of the bolded words fit in the above? Are there subtle differences in meaning among them? Thanks.
    2006

  2. angliholic's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: I felt sympathetic toward/for/with the kids there.

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    2006
    Thanks, 2006.

    To make sure, are the following three identical in meaning?

    I feel sympathetic toward the kids there.
    I feel sympathy for the kids there.

    I sympathize with the kids there.



    Besides, if I am in sympathy with your efforts or objectives, does it mean that I agree on your efforts or objectives?

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    #4

    Re: I felt sympathetic toward/for/with the kids there.

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Thanks, 2006.

    To make sure, are the following three identical in meaning? Yes.

    I feel sympathetic toward the kids there.
    I feel sympathy for the kids there.
    I sympathize with the kids there.


    Besides, if I am in sympathy with your efforts or objectives, does it mean that I agree on your efforts or objectives? Yes. But say 'agree with', not "agree on".
    2006

  3. angliholic's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: I felt sympathetic toward/for/with the kids there.

    Thanks, 2006.
    Gotcha.

  4. #6

    Re: I felt sympathetic toward/for/with the kids there.

    No, only toward is correct.

    Or more likely:
    I felt sympathy for the kids there.
    or more likely yet:
    I felt sorry for the kids there.

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    I felt sympathetic toward/for/with the kids there (an orphanage).



    Do all of the bolded words fit in the above? Are there subtle differences in meaning among them? Thanks.

  5. Amigos4's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: I felt sympathetic toward/for/with the kids there.

    Wouldn't 'empathy' also be appropriate?

    Cheers,
    Amigos4

  6. #8

    Re: I felt sympathetic toward/for/with the kids there.

    No.

    Sympathy means that you are saddened by the suffering of others.

    Empathy would mean that you have the same pain. You can put yourself in someone else's shoes and experience what they're feeling. It's a nuance, but I think it's a distinction worth preserving.

    I still think "I feel sorry for them" would be better.

    salutations
    edward

    Quote Originally Posted by amigos4 View Post
    Wouldn't 'empathy' also be appropriate?

    Cheers,
    Amigos4

  7. angliholic's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: I felt sympathetic toward/for/with the kids there.

    Quote Originally Posted by baqarah131 View Post
    No.

    Sympathy means that you are saddened by the suffering of others.

    Empathy would mean that you have the same pain. You can put yourself in someone else's shoes and experience what they're feeling. It's a nuance, but I think it's a distinction worth preserving.

    I still think "I feel sorry for them" would be better.

    salutations
    edward
    Hi, edward.

    I notice the way you use "salutations" in your post, and I wonder if it amounts to "greeting" in meaning in that context. Could I use "greetings" in that context too? I learned both words from reading in the past, but never used them myself before.

  8. #10

    Re: I felt sympathetic toward/for/with the kids there.

    I think this goes back to a TV show in the 1950s. There was a character who used to say "Greetings and salutations!"

    Used the way I've used "salutations", it's almost humorous; it's an expression you'd use among friends, which I consider you to be.

    These lines at the end of a message are not so important nowadays, since people have got used to e-mail.

    You can say
    best wishes
    best
    regards
    best regards
    or any number of variants.
    Or you can just omit this.

    The word "greetings" would only fit at the beginning of a message. I don't think it's used much nowadays.

    best
    edward

    Quote Originally Posted by angliholic View Post
    Hi, edward.

    I notice the way you use "salutations" in your post, and I wonder if it amounts to "greeting" in meaning in that context. Could I use "greetings" in that context too? I learned both words from reading in the past, but never used them myself before.

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