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      • Native Language:
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    #1

    want

    I would like to know the difference between "1" and '2".
    1. I don't want you to be late.
    2. I don't want you being late.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #2

    Re: want

    1. I don't want you to be late.
    2. I don't want your being late for the job interview.
    Some people will say that "want you being" is acceptable. However, the traditional grammar is possessive pronoun+gerund. (The exceptions needn't worry us.) Whilst (2) then becomes grammatically correct, the first sentence is more colloquial.

  1. Amigos4's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: want

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    1. I don't want you to be late.
    2. I don't want your being late for the job interview.
    Some people will say that "want you being" is acceptable. However, the traditional grammar is possessive pronoun+gerund. (The exceptions needn't worry us.) Whilst (2) then becomes grammatically correct, the first sentence is more colloquial.
    Hi, David!

    'I don't want your being late for the job interview' does not make sense to me.

    Wouldn't it make more sense to say something like 'I don't want your being late to disrupt the job interview'?

    Cheers,
    Amigos4


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #4

    Re: want

    I tried to avoid 'I don't want your being late for your job interview and making a bad impression.'
    How about, I don't want your being late for school again and getting detention."
    As I pointed out to wowenglish1, there's what is grammatically correct, and what we would actually say, which would be variations on (1):
    I don't want you to be late for school again.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
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    #5

    Re: want

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    I tried to avoid 'I don't want your being late for your job interview and making a bad impression.'
    How about, I don't want your being late for school again and getting detention."
    As I pointed out to wowenglish1, there's what is grammatically correct, and what we would actually say, which would be variations on (1):
    I don't want you to be late for school again.
    This may be a difference between AmE and BrE, but I can't say "I don't want your being late for school again and getting detention." For me this is as ungrammatical as «I don't want these late appearances of yours and getting detention». For me, the "your" definitely makes the phrase "your being late for school again" an object noun clause, which requires an infinitive complement: "I don't want your being late for school again *to* + infinitive".

    Lou

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