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    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 178
    #1

    he has occasion to be ill

    dear teachers, please explain it. 1. i am a bit had it up to there. 2. he has occasion to be ill. 3. people seemed to think that if he could cure a dog he could cure everything .





    thanks


    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 554
    #2

    Re: he has occasion to be ill

    The first makes no sense at all. Perhaps you mean 'I've had it up to here'! in which case it expresses anger with a person of situation.

    The second is a little old fashioned but if you replace 'occasion' with 'reason' the meaning will be clearer.

    The context for the third is probably as follows:
    a) He cured a dog that was ill.
    b) People heard about what he had done
    c) The people believed that he must be able to cure people too and so expected him to do so.

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