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    • Join Date: Jan 2008
    • Posts: 2
    #1

    Cool aclaration

    what's the difference between farther and further

  1. #2

    Re: aclaration

    Quote Originally Posted by shayana View Post
    what's the difference between farther and further
    https://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/farther.html

    Excerpt:
    Some authorities (like the Associated Press) insist on “farther” to refer to physical distance and on “further” to refer to an extent of time or degree, but others treat the two words as interchangeable except for insisting on “further” for “in addition,” and “moreover.” You’ll always be safe in making the distinction; some people get really testy about this.


    • Join Date: Jan 2008
    • Posts: 2
    #3

    Question Re: aclaration

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry97 View Post
    https://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/farther.html

    Excerpt:
    Some authorities (like the Associated Press) insist on “farther” to refer to physical distance and on “further” to refer to an extent of time or degree, but others treat the two words as interchangeable except for insisting on “further” for “in addition,” and “moreover.” You’ll always be safe in making the distinction; some people get really testy about this.
    Jerry,
    I am having an esl test in few days, and have to pass it in order to enter to an american company in mexico, monterrey.
    I have already done this test, passed the skills and readings, but failed the grammar.
    Can I rely on you ? could you help in sending me any kind of tests like the esl tests r somthing similar pls??


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #4

    Re: aclaration

    There is no fundamental difference save spelling.

    quote from the Oxford dictionary:

    Is there any difference between further and farther? In the sense ‘at, to, or by a greater distance’ they may be used interchangeably: she moved further down the train and she moved farther down the train are both correct. However further is a much commoner word, and in addition it is used in certain abstract contexts, for example in references to time, in which it would be unusual to substitute farther, e.g. have you anything further to say?; without further delay.

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