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    #1

    stand-down

    Dear teachers,

    Recently I got into trouble by reading the article "Officials Say Iraqi Soldier Killed 2 U.S. Soldiers", written in IHT.

    "He said the Iraqi commander of the Second Army Division ordered an "immediate stand-down of the unit" and cooperated with the investigation."

    I know, there are a few meanings of the present idiom, namely:

    1. leave a witness stand, as in

    "The judge told her to stand down."

    2. withdraw, as from political context, or a game or race, as in

    "Harry decided to stand down as a candidate for major."

    3. go off duty, as in

    The American forces were ordered to stand down.

    I think that at this context Nr.1 is the proper choice, but I am in doubt, whether that is the only one possibility.

    Would you be so kind to help me to put an end of my doubt?

    Thank you in advance for your efforts.

    Regards.

    V.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #2

    Re: stand-down

    Actually, it's more #3.
    Troops stand down when they have a period of relaxation after an alert or having been on patrol. In this case, the Iraqi unit where pulled out of active duty - ordered to stand-down - pending an investigation into the shooting. They need to find out how friendly fire caused this death -how did this Iraqi solider mistake the US soldier for the enemy? - and until they do, if these Iraqi troops are still on active duty, what's to stop the same thing happening again?

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    #3

    Re: stand-down

    Hi DavidL,

    Thank you for your prompt and profound reply.

    Your thorough explanation substantiates the indispensability of my inquire. I stand on my ground that on this place we might use each of them (Nr.1, Nr.2 or Nr.3). Their meanings are closely and interwoven connected each other.

    Thank you for your attention and readiness to help others.

    Regards.

    V.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #4

    Re: stand-down

    In the context of the report, there is only one applicable meaning and that is that the troops were taken off active service. It is the normal military term for this situation.

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    #5

    Re: stand-down

    Hi Anglika,

    Thank you for your pressing particularization. I make no objection to your statement. But we have to try to see through the words and phrase.

    There are more lines of the mentioned above article.

    "The investigation by American and Iraqi authorities may renew longstanding question about the loyalties of Iraqi forces, who are supported to assume control as American troops withdrew."

    "withdraw" = not "go off duty"

    In my opinion, one thing is 1. to leave a witness stand (to leave for short time, as long as continues a investigation); quite near to that is 2. withdraw-to take back or away from the duty transitory as above at 1. and there is quite different (your variant) 3. go off duty (demobilization) (withdrawal of a military presence).

    In the case of your variant (Nr.3), the American troops have come to stay
    in Iraq till to the Second Coming.

    I am deeply convinced we don't want that?

    Regards.

    V.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #6

    Re: stand-down

    In this context, the unit concerned does not "withdraw" but is/has been actively ordered out of service. It is particular to the situation and nature of the event.

    I don't understand your point about the Forces and their term of service. It is irrelevant.

    The report is quite clear that investigations are taking place and until the military have finished these and concluded what in fact happened, the unit concerned has been ordered [taken] out of active service.

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    #7

    Re: stand-down

    Hi Anglika,

    Thank you for your categorical statement.

    The point about the forces, which you called irrelevant, actually is th point appointed from the article's author, who is an American. A few words for your information,: the trained Iraqi forces have to change the American troops as they would be withdrawn later from Iraqi. If there is a never-ending stream of alternating demobilizations (go of duty) of different units of Iraqi forces, which are supported to assume control over Iraqi, then who will change the American troops if all disloyal units of Iraqi forces were demobilized.

    Please, excuse my frankness. I see, you manage English perfectly, but you are remote from military affairs and politic. Let things take their course. Our immediate goal is steadily adoption of English language.

    Thank you for your tenaciously patience and marked attention towards my humble person.

    Regards.

    V.


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    #8

    Re: stand-down

    With respect, Vil, I am actually not remote from military matters, and politics affects us all.

    This report is related to the reported shooting of American servicemen by an Iraqi soldier, and the stand-down + investigations are under the orders of the Iraqi Army.

    It is specific to this event and not to the larger picture.

    I do not propose to pursue this discussion, save in so far as the term "stand-down" may need clarification.

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    #9

    Re: stand-down

    Hi Anglika,

    Thank you again for your unyielding staunchness.

    I understand your insistence.

    Against my will I agree on all important points referring the matter of interest to me, especially the meaning of the idiom "stand down." By your permission I would attract your attention last towards the meaning of "stand down" (n), namely "a relaxation from a state of readiness or alert." I was mislead from this meaning. That one was grounds for my long-winded inquiries.

    I feel awkward about doing that malapropism.

    Regards.

    V.

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