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  1. Bushwhacker's Avatar
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    #1

    Cool canal-side shipping and tavern-keeping

    In the following sentence:

    Widow of a trumpeter associated with the Army, quay-side and canal-side shipping and tavern-keeping"

    Problems in red.

    Does quay-side and canal-side shipping mean "a worker both at the quay and at the canal"?

    Does tavern-keeping mean "someone in charge of a tavern"? Or are talking on the owner of a tavern?

    Thanks a lot.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #2

    Re: canal-side shipping and tavern-keeping

    Yes and yes.

    It's difficult to be absolutely sure without more context, though.

  2. Bushwhacker's Avatar
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    #3

    Cool Re: canal-side shipping and tavern-keeping

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Yes and yes.

    It's difficult to be absolutely sure without more context, though.
    Sorry, but there isn't more context because it's a biographical note about one of Rembrandt's lovers, beginning like that and going on with other considerations. As a matter of fact, I have another doubt about this sentence.

    Widow of a trumpeter associated with the Army, quay-side and canal-side shipping and tavern-keeping

    Doubts in red are referring to her husband or are they activities she herself took on? After "keeping" there is a full stop to talk on another thing quite different.
    Nevertheless, I'd be extremely grateful if you can tell me your suggestions about what do you think despite the fact, as you say, it is not quite clear because lack of concreteness.

    Thank you again.



    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #4

    Re: canal-side shipping and tavern-keeping

    I think your suggestion that the trumpeter worked as a dockhand, both in sea ports and on the canals, and as a tavern-keeper is probably correct. The use of "quayside" and "canal-side" implies he did not work on board boats or barges.

    I very much doubt that the woman did these things. It would be unlikely in the social structure of the place and period.

    If this passage refers to Geertje Dircx, her husband had worked as a ship's carpenter.

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