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    • Join Date: Dec 2007
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    #1

    soldiers

    Well I often watch American films to learn English.
    I have one question: in the army, I notice that when a private understands clearly the order of an officer, he will shout something. He means "I got it, sir." But I couldn't make out what he says. The pronuncation is close to "eye-eye, sir"
    What does the private actually say ?

  1. heidita's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: soldiers

    Hi sympathy, by far the most frequent spelling is aye, which is also used in the sailor’s double response to an order (Aye-aye, sir.)

    It's a variant spelling of the affirmative reply “yes” and also of the noun for such replies (The ayes have it.)
    cheers


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #3

    Re: soldiers

    Note - "aye aye" is only used in the Navy, not in either the Army or the Airforce.

  2. heidita's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: soldiers

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Note - "aye aye" is only used in the Navy, not in either the Army or the Airforce.

    Oh, it isn't? Then, which one is used? I thought I had heard that in films ...

    cheers


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    #5

    Re: soldiers

    Yes, sir.

    But don't forget that marines [who act like foot-soldiers] are in fact part of the Navy.

  3. heidita's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: soldiers

    I see, Anglika. Of course, I knew this Yes,sir, but I thought "aye, aye sir", was sort of more popular.

    thanks.

    cheers

  4. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: soldiers

    "Aye-aye, sir" is used by both the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Marines.

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    #8

    Re: soldiers

    Do they still say 'aye-aye'?

    Jag


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #9

    Re: soldiers

    Yes - and in the British Navy as well.

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    #10

    Re: soldiers

    And in some parts of Britain 'yes' has been replaced by 'aye'. In Newcastle, for example.

    Jag

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