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    #1

    take receipt of someone

    Hi all,

    Imagine the following situation:
    - you are rich
    - you are getting married soon
    - you are setting up your new house a few days before the wedding and you take on a butler and a housemaid (remember, you are rich!)
    and, finally you tell somebody –in a formal way, i think– that:
    «I took receipt of the housemaid»

    Does it mean you welcomed her into the house?

    Thanks!


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: take receipt of someone

    It is not something I would expect to hear, unless the housemaid was a robot.

    What are you trying to say - that the maid has started work?

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    #3

    Re: take receipt of someone

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    It is not something I would expect to hear, unless the housemaid was a robot.

    What are you trying to say - that the maid has started work?
    Hi Anglika,
    Well, certainly she was not a robot... I get your point, you do not sign a receipt of a person.
    From the context i thought of three possibilities:
    - you already know the first, that she started to work,
    - the second was that she, as a part of her job, told you what things to buy (food, etc.) in a receipt-like list.
    - The third, that she went shopping herself and gave you the receipt of the goods to justify the expense.

    The full context is: London 1839:
    «He ordered coal, took receipt of the housemaid Mary, interviewed and appointed a butler...». There is no previous mention of that Mary.

    Thanks!


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #4

    Re: take receipt of someone

    That actually puts a different complexion on your query.

    In terms of the early 19th century, this would be an acceptable use of the term "receipt" - he received the maid [into the house].

    • Member Info
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    #5

    Re: take receipt of someone

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    That actually puts a different complexion on your query.

    In terms of the early 19th century, this would be an acceptable use of the term "receipt" - he received the maid [into the house].
    That was it... always the context. I do promise to be fully specific from now on

    Thank You, Anglika.

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