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  1. #1
    beeja is offline Member
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    write ... as ...

    Hello guys,

    A sentence says "Franklin wrote the Autobiography as an old man, considered a great man"

    I think it says that Franklin wrote this book by using an old man as its character. But my friend says that he wrote this book when he was old.

    Pls clarify which one is correct.

    Thanks,


  2. #2
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    Re: write ... as ...

    Quote Originally Posted by beeja
    Hello guys,

    A sentence says "Franklin wrote the Autobiography as an old man, considered a great man"

    I think it says that Franklin wrote this book by using an old man as its character. But my friend says that he wrote this book when he was old.

    Pls clarify which one is correct.

    Thanks,

    I don't get the last part, ..., considered a great man. It just doesn't fit. :(

    Franklin wasn't pretending to be an old man; he was an old man when he wrote his autobiography.

    Note, An autobiography is a written account of one's own life. :wink:

    All the best,

  3. #3

    Re: write ... as ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by beeja
    Hello guys,

    A sentence says "Franklin wrote the Autobiography as an old man, considered a great man"

    I think it says that Franklin wrote this book by using an old man as its character. But my friend says that he wrote this book when he was old.

    Pls clarify which one is correct.

    Thanks,

    I don't get the last part, ..., considered a great man. It just doesn't fit. :(

    Franklin wasn't pretending to be an old man; he was an old man when he wrote his autobiography.

    Note, An autobiography is a written account of one's own life. :wink:

    All the best,
    Could it be ... as an old man when he was considered being a great man?

  4. #4
    beeja is offline Member
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    Re: write ... as ...

    Quote Originally Posted by twostep
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea

    I don't get the last part, ..., considered a great man. It just doesn't fit. :(

    Franklin wasn't pretending to be an old man; he was an old man when he wrote his autobiography.

    Note, An autobiography is a written account of one's own life. :wink:

    All the best,
    Could it be ... as an old man when he was considered being a great man?
    I don't understand why "considered a great man" too. And that's why I poped up a question that Franklin might write about himself but use "an old man" (absolutely himself) as a character telling the story (or autobiography) about how to be "a great man". sound possible?

    um..mmm, did i think too much???

  5. #5
    beeja is offline Member
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    Ah, one more question.

    Franklin's Autobiography is an up-by-the-bootstraps story representing the freedom to crate and prosper that is the essence of American morality. Yet given the authorís great sense of humor, his chameleon qualities, and his skill at self-promotion, it would be naÔve to take The Art of Virtue or the Autobiography as oneís gospel. Reverence is not a very Franklinesque trait.

    I don't understand the red text. It's quite confusing.

    Pls explain.

    tks,

  6. #6
    Bea there is no such thing as thinking too much. :wink:

    Where did you come across the sentence? Can you double check?

  7. #7
    beeja is offline Member
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    Oh, forgot one last question...for Franklin, :P

    It quotes:

    The Autobiography was published, but covered his life only up to 1758. It had been written in fits between 1771 and 1790 while he was living in France.

    My Question: Why covered his life up to 1758 but written in fits between 1771 and 1790?


  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by beeja
    Oh, forgot one last question...for Franklin, :P

    It quotes:

    The Autobiography was published, but covered his life only up to 1758. It had been written in fits between 1771 and 1790 while he was living in France.

    My Question: Why covered his life up to 1758 but written in fits between 1771 and 1790?

    google "benjamin franklin" 1758
    Franklin ceased writing for Poor Richards Almanc - a change of direction in his life. The autobiography was written later on.

  9. #9
    beeja is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by twostep
    Bea there is no such thing as thinking too much. :wink:

    Where did you come across the sentence? Can you double check?
    I quoted it from the book, 50 Self-Help Classics by Tom Butler-Bowdon.

    Oh, is it possible that Tom'd like to say Franklin wrote this book when he was old, after he was considered (by American people) a great man.

    Sound ok?

    :?


    Ah, when writer wrote "Franklin scholar Russel B. Nye termed his subject "the first apostle of frugality and the patron saint of savings accounts".

    Does "termed his subject" here mean that Russel B. Nye named Franklin as "the first...."?

    and "Franklin scholar Russel B. Nye" equals to Russel B. Nye who has studied the life of Franklin, correct?

    :)

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by beeja
    Quote Originally Posted by twostep
    Bea there is no such thing as thinking too much. :wink:

    Where did you come across the sentence? Can you double check?
    I quoted it from the book, 50 Self-Help Classics by Tom Butler-Bowdon.

    Oh, is it possible that Tom'd like to say Franklin wrote this book when he was old, after he was considered (by American people) a great man.

    Sound ok?

    :?

    You figured it out!!!!!!!!!!!1


    Ah, when writer wrote "Franklin scholar Russel B. Nye termed his subject "the first apostle of frugality and the patron saint of savings accounts".

    Does "termed his subject" here mean that Russel B. Nye named Franklin as "the first...."?

    and "Franklin scholar Russel B. Nye" equals to Russel B. Nye who has studied the life of Franklin, correct?

    :)

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