Results 1 to 5 of 5
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Spain
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 181
    #1

    Adantless

    Hi all,
    Here i am again, with another early 19th puzzle.
    «Edward is such a perfect Adantless in his best livery that he is quite a sight»

    Context: London 1839. Edward is the new butler.

    What must a butler do to be «Adantless»?


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: Adantless

    "Adonis" is most likely the word meant here.

    It is used to say a man looks particularly beautiful or handsome: "He is a veritable Adonis".

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Spain
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 181
    #3

    Re: Adantless

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    "Adonis" is most likely the word meant here.

    It is used to say a man looks particularly beautiful or handsome: "He is a veritable Adonis".
    Thanks Anglika. It is perfectly clear.
    Is the use of this word kind of aged or something? I haven´t found any reference to it anywhere...

    That meaning of Adonis is exactly the same in Spanish. The difficulty for me was its relation with Adantless.

    Thanks again


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #4

    Re: Adantless

    It is a phrase you might hear from educated people. It is not what I would call in general use.

    "Adantless" means nothing to me, unless it was deliberately written to be what is known as a "malapropism" - wrong use of one word instead of another word because they sound similar to each other

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Spain
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 181
    #5

    Re: Adantless

    I see.

    In fact I had the following doubt from the context:
    Adantless could mean he looked pretty good or pretty bad, as you can also be «quite a sight» if your clothes do not fit you well.
    The point i did not guess is that of yours of "malapropism", and you sound absolutely reasonable. Both words, Adantless and Adonis could be pronounced in a very similar way.
    I sometimes forget, as an English learner, that native English writers or speakers can also make 'little' mistakes. Of course mine are much greater, :D.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •