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    #1

    Noncount

    Please do these three statements mean the same thing when using non-counts (chanage, revision) in a general sense:

    1. Change in political conditions creates opportunities for revision in political rules.

    2. A change in political conditions creates opportunities for a revision in political rules.

    3. Changes in political conditions creates opportunities for revisions in political rules.


    I do not know why "Theory" is noncount. What is the difference between "economic theory" and "an economic theory" or "economic theories"? Does "economic theories" imply a general way of referring to economic theory in much the way as the "lion", "lions", or "a lion" are generally used?
    Last edited by kooiu; 17-Jan-2008 at 00:28.

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    #2

    Re: Noncount

    1. Change in political conditions creates opportunities for revision in political rules.

    Change / creates / opportunities / for revision

    2. A change in political conditions creates opportunities for a revision in political rules.

    A change / creates / an opportunity / for revision

    3. Changes in political conditions creates opportunities for revisions in political rules.

    Changes / create / opportunities / for revisions


    Theory is a very abstract subject, like science. One usually discusses one theory, the theory, a theory, not many theories.

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    #3

    Re: Noncount

    Thank you susiedqq for your help.

    I however do not have any problem with your restatements of my sentences.

    I was asking if the three statements mean the same thing given that the statements seem general and that "change" and "revision" are uncountable nouns. The second and third statements will be clear to me if they are about specific instances of change and revision that actually occur- we had a change of mind about the issue yesterday, or we understook a revision of our paper yesterday.

    My question: Are the following statements general statements and why?

    1. Change in political conditions creates opportunities for revision in political rules.

    2. A change in political conditions creates opportunities for a revision in political rules.

    3. Changes in political conditions creates opportunities for revisions in political rules.


    Theory: I have come across references to "economic theories", "an economic theory", "economic theory" in the same article. Since "theory" is abstract, why not just economic theory? Or does "economic theory" mean "economic science" while "economic theories" and "an economic theory" may not make sense?

    My main concern here is when an uncountable noun (an abstract noun) may be used like a countable noun (or countable nouns) in a general sense without implying specific instances as in these two general statements about the countable noun "muscian":
    "Muscians must work hard for success"
    "A muscian must work hard for success"

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    #4

    Re: Noncount

    I am not sure what you want to know but when I see these two sentences I think:

    (all, many, some, few, global category) "Musicians must work hard for success"

    (one who has chosen this career in music) "A musician must work hard for success"


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    #5

    Re: Noncount

    Quote Originally Posted by kooiu View Post

    Theory: I have come across references to "economic theories", "an economic theory", "economic theory" in the same article. Since "theory" is abstract, why not just economic theory? Or does "economic theory" mean "economic science" while "economic theories" and "an economic theory" may not make sense?

    Without context - the article may be discussing economic theories in principle and practice. The author needs to refer to the multiple theories [economic theories], specific theory [an economic theory] or economic theory in general [economic theory].

    My main concern here is when an uncountable noun (an abstract noun) may be used like a countable noun (or countable nouns) in a general sense without implying specific instances as in these two general statements about the countable noun "musician":
    "Musicians must work hard for success"
    "A musician must work hard for success"


    Abstract nouns are not necessarily uncountable. Theory has a plural - theories.

    .

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    #6

    Re: Noncount

    Thank you, susiedqq and Anglika. Very grateful for your help.

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