Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Italian
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • Italy

    • Join Date: Sep 2004
    • Posts: 596
    #1

    are these sentences correct?

    Hi, I'd like to know if the following sentences are ok. I know that at least two of them may sound weird, but I have tried to be so close to the italian version as possible. Are they acceptable? I could improve them, trying no to be so far from the original language (and from their ironical way)?
    Thanks a lot. Rip


    1)You can count only on your strenght

    2) (a father says so to his son, who doesnít study very much): ďI havenít got a factory to leave you in inheritance (you canít waste your time because your father is not so rich and you have to work your ass off in your life)

    3) The Finnish fischermen are happy with their job in any case because they have studied a lot ( even the people who do a hard job are happy if they have studied a lot in their life; so: even if you choose to become a fisherman in a remote country you must study and be grateful because you had the opportunity to study)

  1. apex2000's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Wales

    • Join Date: Nov 2005
    • Posts: 785
    #2

    Re: are these sentences correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by ripley View Post
    [FONT=Times New Roman]


    1)You can count only on your strenght
    OK, but 'strength'

    2) (a father says so to his son, who doesnít study very much): ďI havenít got a factory to leave you in inheritance (you canít waste your time because your father is not so rich and you have to work your ass off in your life)
    The choice of 'factory' would be unusual unless the father had, or had had, a factory at some time. 'In' should be replaced by either 'as an' or 'for your'.
    There are other ways to express this subject: you will not get an inheritance from me, or, I have nothing to leave you, or, I have nothing left for you to inherit.


    You might even say 'you'll have to work because I have nothing you may inherit'.
    3) The Finnish fischermen are happy with their job in any case because they have studied a lot ( even the people who do a hard job are happy if they have studied a lot in their life; so: even if you choose to become a fisherman in a remote country you must study and be grateful because you had the opportunity to study)
    The Finnish fishermen are happy with their work even though they have had the benefit of studying for a lot of their lives.
    Must they study and be grateful? Or was their studying a normal result of education for Finns? Should they be more grateful than other Finns?

  2. RonBee's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2003
    • Posts: 16,551
    #3

    Re: are these sentences correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by ripley View Post

    1)You can count only on your strength

    More usual:
    You can only count on your strength.
    The word "only" normally goes between the two parts of a compound verb. Examples:
    It will only last an hour.
    It will only take five more minutes.
    I am only the assistant manager.
    ~R

  3. apex2000's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Wales

    • Join Date: Nov 2005
    • Posts: 785
    #4

    Re: are these sentences correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    More usual:
    You can only count on your strength.
    ~R
    However, this does not necessarily show the emphasis. Should the intention be to emphasise 'only count' or 'only on your strength'?
    It may not be important in the sentence provided, but it could be in another context.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Italian
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • Italy

    • Join Date: Sep 2004
    • Posts: 596
    #5

    Re: are these sentences correct?

    Hi Apex 2000,
    the use of factory ( I could have said company or I am not "...name of a famous manager") is meant to stress the fact that the father is not at all rich. isn't there in English something like that?
    and about the fishermen... The father who said that knew ( they said that at a conference) that the Finnish fishermen are generally more educated than other people who do jobs which don't require a high level of education. the father was trying to say that these fishermen are happy, despite their job, because they studied a lot; they are not sad because their job doesn't correspod to their level of education; they are simply happy because they possess thet level of education. Please tell me if I made myself clear and how can I made the sentence more clear if it isb't.
    I sidn't understand why should I use work instead of job. In the sentence I referred to their profession...
    about rascal... with this word the father meant that the son behave like a fool because he wastes his time doing silly things or not thinjking of the consequences of his actions.. Is rascal a swear word? Isn't it proper? Please tell me

    Hope to hear from you soon. Rip

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Italian
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • Italy

    • Join Date: Sep 2004
    • Posts: 596
    #6

    Re: are these sentences correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by apex2000 View Post
    The Finnish fishermen are happy with their work even though they have had the benefit of studying for a lot of their lives.
    Must they study and be grateful? Or was their studying a normal result of education for Finns? Should they be more grateful than other Finns?
    Hi Apex 2000,
    the use of factory ( I could have said company or I am not "...name of a famous manager") is meant to stress the fact that the father is not at all rich. isn't there in English something like that?
    and about the fishermen... The father who said that knew ( they said that at a conference) that the Finnish fishermen are generally more educated than other people who do jobs which don't require a high level of education. the father was trying to say that these fishermen are happy, despite their job, because they studied a lot; they are not sad because their job doesn't correspod to their level of education; they are simply happy because they possess thet level of education. Please tell me if I made myself clear and how can I made the sentence more clear if it isb't.
    I sidn't understand why should I use work instead of job. In the sentence I referred to their profession...
    about rascal... with this word the father meant that the son behave like a fool because he wastes his time doing silly things or not thinjking of the consequences of his actions.. Is rascal a swear word? Isn't it proper? Please tell me

    Hope to hear from you soon. Rip

  4. apex2000's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Wales

    • Join Date: Nov 2005
    • Posts: 785
    #7

    Re: are these sentences correct?

    I see what you intend, so try this:
    We would not normally refer to something as specific as a factory or a business unless the father had owned either of them. In your case the father would say simply 'I am not a rich man ( and there will not be a lot of money for you to inherit; there won't be any money for you to inherit; there may be a little money that I can leave you).

    The fact that Finnish fishermen have a high level of education which is not necessary for the work they do does not mean that it is wasted; they respect and enjoy that education.

    Work v job. Work is more general, and job tends to be more specific. It is simply a matter of speaking, not wrong. If we say the job of a fisherman is varied... it does not sound quite right whereas the work of a fisherman... fits the idea better. In this case you could also consider:
    any fisherman has to be a good sailor, a good seaman as well as a good fisherman - so there is variety to the work.
    The job of a clerk is to make paper records. A senior clerk has a range of duties so his work is varied.

    There is no clear rule for this. This is something that you become accustomed to in conversation, like so much in learning a foreign language.

    Rascal is a proper word; its meaning is more mischievous and likeable than any sort of fool who is most likely to be frowned upon even rejected.

    Translations are quite difficult, sometimes enormously so. I have tried to give you a picture reflecting our way of thinking which may not help you in the translation, but allow you to have a different approach. Do ask if there is something which I have not made clear enough.

Similar Threads

  1. Are my sentences correct?
    By daisyeoh@hotmail.com in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 19-Oct-2009, 14:20
  2. Are these sentences correct?
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 03-Jun-2008, 03:59
  3. Could you correct these sentences, please?
    By Ana Laura in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 19-Aug-2007, 14:40
  4. Please correct the sentences ...
    By sweetie_sneha in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-Apr-2007, 13:12
  5. correct sentences
    By Teenager in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-Mar-2007, 06:26

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •